Film Forum LINGUI, THE SACRED LINKS Q&A with filmmaker Mahamat-Saleh Haroun and star Achouackh Abakar Souleymane, co-presented by Africa Is a Country

LINGUI, THE SACRED BONDS Q&A with filmmaker Mahamat-Saleh Haroun and star Achouackh Abakar Souleymane, co-presented by Africa Is a Country

Show on Friday February 4 at 6:50 p.m.

Recorded especially for this screening

Moderated by writer, translator and scholar Sara Hanaburgh

Africa is a country is a site of opinions, analysis and new writings on and from the African left. It was founded by Sean Jacobs in 2009.

Born in Chad, Mahamat-Saleh Haroun first gained critical acclaim for his short films before directing his feature debut, BYE-BYE AFRICA (Best First Film, Venice Film Festival 1999). He then continued with ABOUNA (Our Father) (Directors’ Fortnight, Cannes 2002), DARATT, DRY SEASON (Special Jury Prize, Venice Film Festival 2006), A SCREAMING MAN (Jury Prize, Cannes Film Festival 2010, and a Film Avant-Première Forum), GRIGRIS (Vulcain Prize for Best Cinematography, Official Competition, Cannes Film Festival 2013). HISSEIN HABRÉ, A CHADIAN TRAGEDY, his first documentary film, was selected at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival, Official Selection – Special Screening. UNE SAISON EN FRANCE, his first feature film shot in France, starring Eriq Ebouaney and Sandrine Bonnaire, was selected at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival – Special Presentation. New York paid tribute to Mahamat-Saleh Haroun by hosting two retrospectives of his films: in 2006 at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and in 2018 at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM). In 2010, he received the Robert Bresson Prize for all of his works at the Venice Film Festival and in 2013, the Fellini Medal awarded by UNESCO.

Sara Hanaburgh is a teacher, translator and researcher interested in cinematographic and literary voices from multiple centers around the world, particularly inspired by Chadian, Nigerian, Malian and Senegalese filmmakers. She enjoys reading and writing for Africa Is a Country and is currently editing a volume on adaptations of African literature for the screen. She has co-translated Kaveena (Indiana) by Boubacar Boris Diop and The Fury and cries of women (Virginie) by Angèle Rawiri and teaches at Fordham University.

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