Literature app – Semiospectacle http://semiospectacle.com/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 08:24:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://semiospectacle.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Literature app – Semiospectacle http://semiospectacle.com/ 32 32 Spotify removes the work of some comedians from the streaming service https://semiospectacle.com/spotify-removes-the-work-of-some-comedians-from-the-streaming-service/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 22:31:00 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/spotify-removes-the-work-of-some-comedians-from-the-streaming-service/ Dine Brands CEO John Peyton said Americans are returning to restaurants, but the labor shortage is “unchanged”. Spotify Technology SA POINT 0.11% cut the work of hundreds of comedians, including John Mulaney, Jim Gaffigan and Kevin Hart, amid a new battle for the payment of royalties. Tiffany Haddish, Mike Birbiglia and a host of other […]]]>

Spotify Technology SA POINT 0.11% cut the work of hundreds of comedians, including John Mulaney, Jim Gaffigan and Kevin Hart, amid a new battle for the payment of royalties.

Tiffany Haddish, Mike Birbiglia and a host of other popular artists have joined a group of artists trying to get paid a royalty on a copyright for the jokes they wrote when they air on providers of radio and digital services like Spotify, SiriusXM, Pandora and YouTube.

Much of the comedians effort is directed by Spoken Giants. The global rights administration company, founded in 2019, wants to collect royalties for the underlying copyrights of talk media composition – essentially the lyrics of comedians – in the same way songwriters get paid. for the use of their music and lyrics.

Spotify removed the content after reaching a dead end with Spoken Giants.

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Currently, comics are paid as performers through their label or distributor and the digital performing rights organization SoundExchange when their recordings are released on a digital service. They are not paid directly as the writers of this work – for what Spoken Giants calls their literary rights.

Comedians’ complaints come as songwriters and artists look for ways to control their work and make more money from streaming services and radio.

Spoken Giants is led by Jim King, a former executive with performing rights organization BMI, with Ryan Bitzer and Damion Greiman, co-founders of comedy label 800 Pound Gorilla Records. The company started out representing comedy and joke writers, with plans to expand podcasts, speeches, and lectures.

The organization began to reach out to streaming services and satellite and terrestrial radio in the spring. Other services and radio companies have spoken to Spoken Giants. After some negotiations with Spotify, Spoken Giants said they received an email on the eve of Thanksgiving saying they would remove works represented by the organization until an agreement can be reached.

“Spotify gives artists exposure and access to a wide audience. So the removal of their work is detrimental to every creator,” King said.

Spotify said it has paid “significant sums for the content in question and would like to continue to do so,” adding that the comedians’ labels and distributors have an interest in the conversation.

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One of the challenges would be determining the funding for this new royalty payment. When Spotify signed agreements with labels and comedians distributors, it did so on the understanding that those agreements covered all rights requiring payment. If the new copyrights are to be paid, Spotify will either have to shell out extra money to distribute that content or carve out a portion of what it pays labels and distributors for literary rights.

Word Collections, a digital rights management company launched last year, also works to charge comedians and other spoken word artists for the use of their literary works in streaming, radio, social media, video games and more. fitness services.

Istanbul, Turkey – July 11, 2016: Apple iPhone 6s screen with icons of social media apps Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Spotify, Youtube, Messenger, Apple Music, Safari, Maps, Whatsapp etc.

The dispute highlights an evolution media landscape disturbed by streaming. BMI and ASCAP were founded at the turn of the 20th century to collect license fees on behalf of composers and songwriters as radio took off. Historically, comedy had very few listeners in comparison. That has changed, Mr King said, with comedy albums available on streaming platforms and SiriusXM and others having entire stations dedicated to comedy.

“There wasn’t much to collect before. Now it’s a whole different world where a Gaffigan or a Mulaney have billions of performances on these platforms,” he said. “It now makes sense for a collective licensing business. “

Stand-up comic Eddie Pepitone has said he didn’t realize he didn’t receive royalties for his written material until he signed to Spoken Giants a year ago. “That comics aren’t getting paid for their material is mind-boggling,” he said.

Spotify

A similar problem is at play in music, where publishers are looking for a bigger slice of the streaming pie for songwriters, while Spotify and others offer lower royalty rates.

Gerrit Elzinga joined Spoken Giants as the pandemic took off. His two full albums were recently pulled from Spotify, and now he feels in limbo, not knowing who to blame.

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“It’s just a bummer because I really love Spotify,” he said. “People say streaming is a bad way to pay artists, but the way I see it is you have to look at it long term – people listen to stuff and it becomes a source of income.”


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A Student’s Guide to Creative Undergraduate Journals at UBC https://semiospectacle.com/a-students-guide-to-creative-undergraduate-journals-at-ubc/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 20:15:05 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/a-students-guide-to-creative-undergraduate-journals-at-ubc/ Putting your work in a creative journal is a great way to show that your degree has minimal artistic merit! Kosta Prodanovic dossier It’s 4 a.m., you’ve got your fourth cup of coffee, and you’ve officially adopted the stereotype of the tortured artist. Your wrist feels like it’s about to stop working on this ProCreate […]]]>

Putting your work in a creative journal is a great way to show that your degree has minimal artistic merit! Kosta Prodanovic dossier

It’s 4 a.m., you’ve got your fourth cup of coffee, and you’ve officially adopted the stereotype of the tortured artist. Your wrist feels like it’s about to stop working on this ProCreate artwork for the past seven hours. But I do not speak at all from experience …

Here has The Ubyssey, we can’t quite demand financial compensation for your creative trauma on your behalf, but we can give you the best thing to do: an opportunity to have your art judged by someone other than your mother!

I am joking. Type of.

Getting your work published in a journal is a great way for you to gain recognition for your work. Your friends at The Ubyssey have taken it upon themselves to assist you in this process by compiling a nearly comprehensive guide to all UBC affiliate journals that are ready to accept undergraduate work.

How this guide works

All of these publications were found by searching Google for “UBC Journal” and browsing departmental websites for internal journal mentions. Each post’s descriptions are based on information from their websites, social media, and email statements requested by The Ubyssey.

If you know of any active creative journals affiliated with UBC but not included here, please let us know! Please note that all journals in this guide are listed in alphabetical order. Some of these journals accept both academic and creative work. We will also have a companion guide for strictly academic journals that you can consult soon!

If you want to start your own journal, check out this to guide from the UBC library. Starting your own journal would be a great way to contribute to the creative world of UBC.

Pre-submission checklist

Before we get into the good stuff, let’s cover a few basics. If you find a journal that interests you, be sure to read its “About Us” page or its Guidelines page to make sure your work falls within the scope of that journal. Your manuscript or submission should also be carefully formatted according to their submission guidelines. Keep in mind that most journals require some sort of additional documentation with your submission, such as a cover letter, author bio, etc.

Also, be sure to follow their submission policies! Some reviews go not accept work that has also been submitted to another journal for review. Write down the deadlines in your calendar or in your reminders app to make sure you don’t forget them. It is also handy to write down the contact details of their editorial board to ask them any questions.

The range of acceptable submissions will vary depending on the journal of interest, so be sure to do your own due diligence to understand the different types.

Now for what you are really here for: the publications. Let’s get into it!

Journals that publish both academic and creative work

Beacon: Journal of Media Studies

tag is an annual peer-reviewed and faculty-reviewed multimedia journal that publishes the “works of current UBC undergraduate students who explore and study the subject of media.”

The editor-in-chief of tag, Matthew Asunción, in an emailed statement to The Ubyssey, explained that “as a journal of media studies, [they] cover a wide range of media, including media theory, media analysis (film analysis, new media analysis, art reviews, information policy research, journalism research), as well as creative works (art, prose, photography and new media / mixed mixes). “Asunción writes frequently for The Ubyssey ‘s news and features sections.

Asunción also said that the newspaper is in contact with The statuary of the garden and the Undergraduate Journal of Art History and Visual Culture “Ensuring that students are connected to the journal that can best support their work and their own growth as academics and creators”.

You do not need to be enrolled in the Media Studies program to submit your work. All undergraduates from the Vancouver and Okanagan campuses are welcome. Preference is not given to a particular faculty but rather to articles that fall within the scope of the journal.

If you are interested in submitting a manuscript, be sure to check out their submission guidelines first. The next call for applications will take place from Friday, October 19 to January 7, 2022. Tag’the last volume, Tome ii, is also available on their website with their first volume.

Likewise, if you wish to join the editorial or editorial team, the usual recruitment period for new collaborators is from mid-September to the end of October.

The Garden Statuary: UBC English Undergraduate Journal

Through their website, “The statuary of the garden (TGS) is UBC’s undergraduate literary journal, operated and peer reviewed by [their editorial board composed of] UBC undergraduate students. They publish both creative and scholarly work, including essays on literature and language studies, fiction, poetry, non-fiction, plays, visual arts, photography, musical recordings and music. short films.

They are part of the English Students Association and receive support and feedback from the English Faculty Advisory Board.

They accept submissions twice a year for their winter and spring issues, which are published online in December and April respectively. They are also releasing a print year-end issue in April that includes all of the literary works from that school year’s winter and spring issues.

All UBC undergraduates on both campuses are eligible to submit their work. TGS particularly encourages submissions from “traditionally under-represented voices, including those of Indigenous peoples, people of color, LGBTQIA + people, people from low-income backgrounds, people with neurodiverse and people with disabilities.”

If you are interested in submitting your work, be sure to check out their submission guidelines and browse their previous issues for inspiration.

Please note that the deadline for their next winter issue has already passed. Via a declaration sent by email to The Ubyssey, Editors Colby Payne and Avanna Dhunna encouraged students interested in contributing to the journal to submit their work by Friday, February 25, 2022 at 11:59 p.m. ET.

If you want to join their team, they “typically hire executives at some point during the summer, then hire illustrators and editors in September.” Regular updates are published on their social networks.

Undergraduate Journal of Art History and Visual Culture

According to their website, “The Undergraduate Journal of Art History and Visual Culture (UJAH) is an annual student journal published by the [UBC] Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory (AHVA). ” They focus specifically on the publication of “undergraduate research, works of art and writings in the field of art history and visual culture”.

They welcome applications from all undergraduates, regardless of major, for their editorial team each year at the end of September.

Their standard submission period for academic papers, reviews, and illustrations for their annual print journal is November. Their print publication is released in early April alongside the annual Undergraduate Art History Symposium.

If you are interested in submitting your work to UJAH, be sure to check out their submission guidelines, articles from past conferences and previous issues. The deadline for this year’s submission period was November 28, 2021.

Exclusively creative journals

PRISM International

According to their website, “PRISM International is a quarterly magazine [whose] mandate is to publish the best contemporary writings and translations from Canada and around the world. They publish a variety of literary works, including fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, theater and translation.

PRISM accepts submissions on an ongoing basis. As their promotions editor Alison Barnett confirmed in an emailed statement to The Ubyssey, “[they] don’t discriminate on the basis of credentials. In other words, undergraduates are welcome to submit their work and PRISM readers will not be made aware of the identity of the authors during the review process.

One important exception to this is that they do not accept submissions from current and incoming students and faculty in UBC’s Creative Writing program (this includes UBC’s optional residency MFA program). This is probably because they are supported by the creative writing department at UBC. Please check their submission guidelines for more details.

If you are interested in joining their staff, they are accepting applications for the UBC CRWR graduate student editorial or editorial staff until December 15, 2021.

Decay Journal

Through their website, “decomposition log is a social justice-based literary and multimedia journal committed to conserving the art of marginalized communities. [They] are an internal journal for the Social Justice Institute at the University of British Columbia.

They publish works of fiction, poetry, non-fiction, art and media. Decomp publishes several issues per year and accepts submissions from UBC undergraduates. Preference is not given on the basis of their program or qualifications.

If you are interested in submitting your work, be sure to check out their submission guidelines and their past problems on their website. They are accepting submissions for their next zine, Action as art, until December 15, 2021. Unfortunately, this year’s submission deadline has passed.

They do not have a formal recruitment or application process for their essay. If you are interested in joining the break down the team, please contact them directly via E-mail.

Note: The author is, at the time of writing, an editor of decomposition log.


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Welcome to THE COMMONS – News and Views for Windham County, Vermont https://semiospectacle.com/welcome-to-the-commons-news-and-views-for-windham-county-vermont/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 10:14:24 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/welcome-to-the-commons-news-and-views-for-windham-county-vermont/ BRATTLEBORO — Stephen Perkins, Executive Director of the Vermont Historical Society (VHS), will present the annual Richard O. Hathaway Award for Best Historic State Project to the five local institutions that created and led the funded National Endowment for the Humanities, Project multi-year of Brattleboro words. “The Brattleboro Words Project has created three very accessible […]]]>

BRATTLEBORO — Stephen Perkins, Executive Director of the Vermont Historical Society (VHS), will present the annual Richard O. Hathaway Award for Best Historic State Project to the five local institutions that created and led the funded National Endowment for the Humanities, Project multi-year of Brattleboro words.

“The Brattleboro Words Project has created three very accessible and informative ways for our community and visitors from near and far to learn more about our literary, printing and publishing heritage,” said Peter Elwell, director of the Town of Brattleboro, in a press release.

Elwell said that “every initiative, a mobile app and a website that continues to grow over time (the Brattleboro Words Trail), a traveling ceramic fresco exhibit and a published book (Print Town: Brattleboro’s Legacy of Words) combine to make local history more accessible to our families, schools and visiting tourists.

On December 2, Perkins will present the award to project partners Words Starr LaTronica and Jeanne Walsh of the Brooks Memorial Library; Sandy Rouse of the Brattleboro Literary Festival; Reg Martell and Bill Holiday of the Brattleboro Historical Society; Rolf Parker and Arlene Distler of Write Action; William Edelglass, co-founder of the project and principal investigator (who represented Marlboro College, which administered the project before its closure); and Lissa Weinmann, project manager.

City Manager Peter Elwell, Vermont Folklife Center Board Member Andy Davis (current Project Administrator), VHS Board Member and State Representative Mollie Burke, P / D- Brattleboro and other area leaders are expected to be there.

“Creatively designed as an inclusive city-wide effort, the Brattleboro Words Project forged new relationships around history by connecting amateur historians of all ages with professionals who guided them to produce skillful, accurate and well researched products and content, ”said Perkins. in a press release.

“Although we are awarding the award on the basis of the completed project at this point, we know that stories, events and works of art will continue to be added to this meaningful and important initiative,” he said. .

The project “worked with a variety of academics to ensure rigorous research standards and, in some cases, corrected historical errors,” said John Carnahan, former director of the Brattleboro Historical Society.

He said that John Grayson, whose scholarship focuses on Frederick Douglass, discovered while working with the project’s research team that a speech given by the former abolitionist and slave writer in Brattleboro “was different from the one announced at origin and appears to mark the first time Douglass has spoken. publicly about the Lincoln assassination.

“I can honestly say that for a project developed by a group of citizens, the Brattleboro Words Trail is the most impressive piece of public humanities work I have ever seen,” Mara Williams, former chief curator of the Brattleboro Museum and Art Center and the project’s first champion, said. “It is a remarkable achievement.”

“With so many different voices, different approaches and so many topics, this project helps us understand the richness and complexity of the Brattleboro area,” said Edelglass. “It also challenges us to continue to tell stories to strengthen our community, deepen our understanding of the many experiences of this place and make connections beyond differences. “

The Brattleboro Words Trail continues to help community members and students create new audio stories for the Trail, add historical markers, research and present events.

The Evolving Word Trail murals by local artist Cynthia Parker-Houghton are on display at the project’s headquarters at 118 Elliot Gallery, but will ultimately be shown in a central location in the city to be announced soon.

Editor’s Note: Our terms of service require that you use your real names. We will remove anonymous or pseudonymous comments brought to our attention. We rely on the personal integrity of our readers to support what they say; please don’t write anything to someone you wouldn’t say to their face without needing to wear a ski mask while saying so. Please do your part to make your responses energetic, thoughtful, provocative and civil. We are also taking your comments into account for the letters section of the printed newspaper.


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Enjoy this adorable photo of John Krasinski and Stanley Tucci at Thanksgiving – NBC New York https://semiospectacle.com/enjoy-this-adorable-photo-of-john-krasinski-and-stanley-tucci-at-thanksgiving-nbc-new-york/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 09:42:13 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/enjoy-this-adorable-photo-of-john-krasinski-and-stanley-tucci-at-thanksgiving-nbc-new-york/ In what is perhaps the most charming and healthy photo a celebrity has shared this Thanksgiving, Stanley Tucci posted a candid photo of her holiday season with her brother-in-law, John Krasinski. “HAPPY THANKS FROM MY FAMILY TO YOURSELF,” Tucci captioned a Polaroid-style photo of him and Krasinski hanging out. A quick reminder of the relationship […]]]>

In what is perhaps the most charming and healthy photo a celebrity has shared this Thanksgiving, Stanley Tucci posted a candid photo of her holiday season with her brother-in-law, John Krasinski.

“HAPPY THANKS FROM MY FAMILY TO YOURSELF,” Tucci captioned a Polaroid-style photo of him and Krasinski hanging out.

A quick reminder of the relationship between these two: John Krasinski is married to Emily Blunt, who appeared alongside Tucci in “The Devil Wears Prada” in 2006. Tucci met Blunt’s sister, literary agent Felicity Blunt, at Emily Blunt’s wedding in 2010, and they tied the knot two years later.

The mere fact that Krasinski and Tucci are linked brings joy to many, including TikTok star Alexa Shoen.

In her latest Instagram post, Tucci shared a video of Shoen, in which she admits that when she is “stressed by the weight of the world” she simply calms herself down by remembering that Krasinski and Tucci are step-brothers.

“Which means John Krasinski and Stanley Tucci are both American sons-in-law to the Blunt family,” she said. “And that means there was probably a situation where – I’m already feeling better – at some point they, I don’t know, wore those paper hats that you wear on Boxing Day … and also that ‘they probably, like, trembled hands while carrying a side dish they were bringing to a Thanksgiving dinner somewhere in America.

“It’s my deepest meditative practice to just run through this scenario in my head,” she added.

Tucci gave fans a glimpse of past holiday celebrations with Krasinski, Emily Blunt and Felicity Blunt.

Last Christmas he shared a Instagram video of himself making Cosmo Christmas cocktails for the four of them, while Krasinski and Blunt heckled him from the sideline wearing tinsel tinsel and Santa hats.

This story first appeared on TODAY.com. MORE FROM TODAY:



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Journey into the past – Connacht Tribune – Galway City Tribune: https://semiospectacle.com/journey-into-the-past-connacht-tribune-galway-city-tribune/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 06:12:09 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/journey-into-the-past-connacht-tribune-galway-city-tribune/ Lifestyle – Visitors’ impressions of Galway and its people from 1840 to 1940 are explored in this year’s Great Readings of Galway, a celebration hosted by local public libraries. JUDY MURPHY hears about a series of events examining a century of travel writing about the region and learns the story of a couple who were […]]]>

Lifestyle – Visitors’ impressions of Galway and its people from 1840 to 1940 are explored in this year’s Great Readings of Galway, a celebration hosted by local public libraries. JUDY MURPHY hears about a series of events examining a century of travel writing about the region and learns the story of a couple who were captivated by this “exotic” place on a tour before the Great Famine .

A sighting in a travel book about Conamara being overrun with “tourist crowds,” might strike a chord with people who have witnessed the number of visitors who have traveled to the West in recent years.

What is surprising is that this comment has not been made recently. In fact, it was recorded in the early 1840s when travel writers Samuel Carter Hall and Anna Maria Hall visited Ireland for a three-volume travel series titled Ireland: Its Scenery, Character, etc.

The husband and wife team, who made a living creating guides, were among the earliest promoters of tourism in Ireland and this beautifully illustrated guidebook provides a social and cultural history of the 32 counties as well as a description of the landscape through which they traveled. . They hoped to educate the British about Ireland as a tourist destination – “to make Ireland better known to England” – while ensuring that the Union of Great Britain and Ireland remains strong. .

The Halls’ observations of Galway and the illustrations by prominent artists that accompanied their writings are explored as part of this year’s Galway Big Reading, an annual event hosted by Galway Public Libraries.

The theme for the 2021 Big Read is Westward Ho: A Ramble through Galway, 1840-1940. Also on the menu is the 1867 book, Lough Corrib, Its Shores and Islands: With Notices of Lough Mask, written by the famous surgeon and antiquarian Sir William Wilde, who built the Moytura Lodge in Cong as a vacation home and, later , as a fishing spot. lodge in Illaunroe near Leenane.

The County of Corrib, by 20th century travel writer and filmmaker Richard Hayward illustrated by J Humbert Craig, published in 1943, is also the subject of discussion. Hayward, who died in 1964, was a prolific travel writer whose other books include Connacht and the City of Galway (1952).

The aim of the Annual Big Read is to promote Galway’s culture through its literary heritage and history, as explained by the organizers, Acting Executive Librarian, Josephine Vahey, and Archivist, Patria McWalter.

Galway’s first Big Reading took place in 2013 as part of the Decade of Commemoration, marking the centenary of Irish independence.

To find out more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune digital publishing app

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition app to access Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click on HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from the Apple App Store, or HERE to get the Android version from Google Play.

Or buy the digital edition for PC, Mac or laptop at Pagesuite HERE.

Download the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app hosts everything happening in the City and County of Galway. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information about what’s happening in your area. Click on HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from the Apple App Store, or HERE to get the Android version from Google Play.


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Eminent poet Robert Bly, author of “Iron John”, dies at 94 https://semiospectacle.com/eminent-poet-robert-bly-author-of-iron-john-dies-at-94/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 04:23:10 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/eminent-poet-robert-bly-author-of-iron-john-dies-at-94/ Robert Bly, one of the most prominent American poets of the past half century and author of the men’s movement bestseller “Iron John”, has passed away. He was 94 years old. Bly, a poet, writer and editor active for more than 50 years and a famous translator of the work of international poets, died Sunday […]]]>

Robert Bly, one of the most prominent American poets of the past half century and author of the men’s movement bestseller “Iron John”, has passed away. He was 94 years old.

Bly, a poet, writer and editor active for more than 50 years and a famous translator of the work of international poets, died Sunday at his home in Minneapolis after suffering from dementia for 14 years, said his daughter, Mary Bly.

“Dad had no pain. … His whole family was around him, so what can you do better? She told The Associated Press.

Bly published his first collection of poems, “Silence in the Snowy Fields,” in 1962. He won the National Book Award in 1968 for “The Light Around the Body,” a book of poems in protest against the Vietnam War. Bly donated the $ 1,000 prize to the Draft Resistance movement.

But the native of Madison, in western Minnesota, gained his greatest fame for a work in prose entitled “Iron John: A Book About Men”. His Meditation on Modern Masculinity was released in 1990 and spent over two years on the New York Times bestseller list.

The book helped start a new movement of men, but also angered some feminists and attracted some ridicule by calling out images of shirtless businessmen gathering in the forest to beat drums and yell at the moon.

“The media called all of this drumming and racing in the woods, which reduced it to something ridiculous,” Bly told the Paris Review in an interview in 2000. “I think the seminars for men did not threaten the women’s movement at all, but a lot of Iron John’s critics didn’t get it. “

Born on the family farm near Madison in 1926, Bly later said he started writing poetry in high school to impress a beautiful high school English teacher. After a brief stint in the Navy, he landed at Harvard in 1947 and found himself surrounded by some of the greatest figures of the country’s literary scene, such as the late Adrienne Rich, a classmate of his who became a distinguished poet and writer. feminist.

From there he went to New York – he sometimes slept in Grand Central Station when he couldn’t find an apartment to crash into – then a year to the Iowa Writer’s Workshop. Bly returned to Minnesota where he will live most of the rest of his life.

Back in Madison, Bly and another local poet started a poetry magazine which they dubbed The Fifties (later renamed The Sixties, then The Seventies). The inside of the cover signaled their intention to shake up the literary establishment with this warning: “Much of the poetry published in America today is too old-fashioned.

“Until then, there was a sort of academic lock on traditional poetry. It all looked very Victorian and a bit fried, stuffy, complacent, ”said Thomas R. Smith, a longtime friend of Bly’s who worked for many years as an assistant and co-edited several books on him. . “He challenged the convention that all important poetry came from the coasts and college campuses, and created a new space for poets in the American Midwest.”

In addition to writing poems influenced by his predecessors and peers in other countries, Bly also made an effort to present his original work to American readers. Over the years, with the help of native speakers, Bly has translated several dozen poets into several languages. Several poets he translated and defended, including the Chilean Pablo Neruda and the Swede Tomas Transtromer, won the Nobel Prize for Literature.

“The translation work is an incredible part of his heritage in its own right,” said Jeff Shotts, editor of the Minneapolis-based Graywolf Press, which has published some of Bly’s translations and other work.

With her tall, beefy physique and a thick tuft of wild hair – turned snow white in her later years – Bly made a striking figure. His poetry readings were often exciting affairs: he often wore colorful masks or shawls, made jokes and made wild gestures, and used to read the same poem twice in a row.

“It looks like the first time the poem got stuck in your head, but the second time it can go down your chest,” said James Lenfestey, a fellow poet who was Bly’s neighbor in Minneapolis for. many years.

George Borchardt, his agent for several decades, recalled one of his readings in New York.

“I remember it was packed and people were really hanging on to every word. He was a great reader, ”said the agent.

Borchardt also remembered Bly as a pleasure to portray.

“He was not the kind of writer who needed guidance in his writing,” he said.

Bly and his first wife, Carol, divorced in 1979; he moved to Minneapolis shortly thereafter. Bly is survived by his second wife, Ruth, whom he married in 1980, four children – Mary, Bridget Noah, Micha Bly and her stepdaughter Wesley Dutta – and nine grandchildren.

Over the years, Bly has published over two dozen books of poetry, multiple translations of the works of other poets, and a handful of non-fiction books of which “Iron John” was the most famous.

Smith said that “Iron John” had its roots in Bly coming to terms with her relationship with her father, a taciturn Norwegian farmer.

“This has led to a review of what it is to be a man,” Smith said. “He saw Americans at a crossroads. He feared that men would lose their interior life, their sentimental life, their connection with stories, traditions and literature. But the cartoon became that he was John Wayne with a drum. It is the opposite of what it was.

Mary Bly said funeral services will be private. She urged fans to send memorial donations to their favorite poetry associations.

“He was a great poet and a great father,” she said.

“And a great husband,” said Ruth Bly.


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Striking new sculpture symbolizes eternal hope for the people of Lanarkshire https://semiospectacle.com/striking-new-sculpture-symbolizes-eternal-hope-for-the-people-of-lanarkshire/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 09:50:00 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/striking-new-sculpture-symbolizes-eternal-hope-for-the-people-of-lanarkshire/ A striking new sculpture towering over the South Lanarkshire skyline aims to reflect the scale of the climate emergency and serve as a poignant and enduring reminder of the need to take care of each other and our planet. Unveiled at the COP26 summit, the 23m high Sculpture of hope now controls the Cuningar Loop […]]]>

A striking new sculpture towering over the South Lanarkshire skyline aims to reflect the scale of the climate emergency and serve as a poignant and enduring reminder of the need to take care of each other and our planet.

Unveiled at the COP26 summit, the 23m high Sculpture of hope now controls the Cuningar Loop woodland park, part of Clyde Gateway, Scotland’s largest and most ambitious regeneration program.

The striking sculpture features a child neutral in terms of age, gender and race, embracing the surrounding nature and striving for a greener and more hopeful future.



The Lanarkshire Live app is available for download now.

Get all the news for your area – plus features, entertainment, sports and the latest information on Lanarkshire’s recovery from the coronavirus pandemic – right at your fingertips, 24/7.

The free download features the latest breaking news and exclusive stories, and lets you customize your page according to the sections that interest you most.

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The child’s silhouette towers over elegant 20m tall columns that take their shape from the brick chimney stems that once littered Glasgow’s East End.

Unlike its predecessors, this deconstructed chimney rod is made from an innovative low carbon, 100% cement-free concrete, incorporating locally sourced aggregates and recycled crushed glass into the child’s structure.



Hope sculpture dominates the Cuningar Loop skyline

Achieving a 75% reduction in carbon emissions, the Sculpture of Hope in the Rutherglen Green Space joins two other new public art installations by artist and designer Steuart Padwick, located in and around the host city of the COP26.

The 4.5m high Glimmer of hope , made from profiled layers of Scotland-grown Sitka Spruce, celebrates the expansion of the timber construction industry in Scotland and is aimed at anyone passing through Glasgow Central Station, a architectural significance.

Padwick’s third sculpture, the Hope Triptych , is a playful adaptation of 3.5 m high of the Child of hope, and is composed of three colored figures, symbolizing the power to come together.



The Beacon of Hopes reaches out to those passing through Glasgow Central Station

Located in the Rottenrow Gardens of the University of Strathclyde, the triptych is made from reclaimed sheet steel with a low carbon cementless concrete foundation.

The sculpture of hope began as a conversation with Ramboll [lead consultant] and became a gift from 50 companies in Glasgow, ”said Steuart Lanarkshire Live.

“It is a testament to the power of collaboration and dedication to provide a better future. We all need to tackle this new global agenda so that our young people can embrace a hopeful future.



Hope Triptych at the University of Strathclyde symbolizes the power to come together

“It’s very simple: why would anyone want to poison their future?

Associating the built environment with improving mental well-being, Steuart worked with the Mental Health Foundation on all of the messages conveyed by the sculptures.

Words of Hope have been written by some of Scotland’s favorite voices, writers and poets including Jackie Kay, Andrew O’Hagan, Ali Smith and Douglas Stuart, winner of the Booker Prize 2020, as well as local school children , including elementary students from St Columbkille Fraser. Kirkwood, nine, and Luca Miller, 11.



Rutherglen resident Geraldine Baird coordinated the community’s contribution to the project

These messages were inscribed directly on all of the sculptures, including the Caithness Stones at Cuningar Loop.

Near each artwork is mental health signage, highlighting a range of essential support services.

During the Sculpture of Hope planning process, Steuart and Project Director Natalie Alexopoulos reached out to Rutherglen resident Geraldine Baird MBE to solicit input from the community.

Geraldine brought in community members Liz Bell and Christine McPhail to form a support group. She has also hosted presentations with the Rutherglen Library, Councilors, School Directors, the Local Heritage Society, Historians and the New Deacon of St Columbkille Church.



The figure of the Child Hope Sculpture stands on elegant columns that take their shape from the brick chimneys of Glasgow’s East End

Geraldine tell us : “We feel privileged to have this significant work of art in our region, from which the people of Rutherglen and beyond will benefit immensely.

“The sculpture of hope will not only be a place of reflection, but will become a meeting point and, who knows, perhaps a place where we can organize musical and literary events.

“It has been a wonderful experience working with Steuart and Natalie – two creative and caring people, so inclusive and so inspiring. We have forged a friendship that I hope will last.

Director Natalie paid tribute to the companies and individuals with whom she collaborated during the project.



Cuningar Loop is a legacy of the Commonwealth Games

She added, “Their integrity, drive and commitment to making a difference has been inspiring. “

Councilor John Ross, Head of South Lanarkshire Council, said: “The Hope Sculpture is a magnificent addition to the landscape of South Lanarkshire.

“This will serve as a very visible reminder of the care we all need to take to protect both our environment and our own mental health, and as such I truly believe it will indeed inspire hope in the people of South Lanarkshire and beyond for generations to come. “

Cuningar Park was once a major contributor to the Industrial Revolution. It was the location of Farme Colliery from 1805 to 1931 – the last mine to be mined within Glasgow city limits.



Locally sourced aggregates and recycled crushed glass are found in the child structure of the sculpture

From 1810 to 1897, the area north of the Hope Sculpture was a reservoir supplying Glasgow with water – possibly the world’s first large-scale municipal pumped water supply.

After years of decline and neglect, in 2014 Cuningar’s fortunes changed when he was chosen to become a Commonwealth Games Legacy Forest Park.

Today, the UK Geoenergy Observatory at Cuningar Loop – an open research center operated by the British Geological Survey – is helping scientists, industry and policy makers understand how hot water from these abandoned mines could be used as source of renewable thermal energy and contribute to the UK’s ambition to decarbonise its energy supply and achieve net zero by 2050.

Martin McKay, Executive Director of Regeneration at Clyde Gateway, said: “With Glasgow hosting COP26, the main United Nations climate change conference, I can’t think of anything better for the Hope Sculpture, which symbolizes the hope to build a greener, healthier future, to call home the city’s East End – an area that demonstrates that rapid transformations are possible.

“Clyde Gateway communities are used to welcoming visitors from all over the world and I have no doubt that they will be just as proud of this legacy of COP26 as they were of the Commonwealth Games in 2014.”

Bike Town, Camglen Radio and the Healthy n happy Community Trust are other supporters of the project in South Lanarkshire.

Steuart and Natalie said they felt very lucky to have been so warmly welcomed and supported by so many members of the community, including Healthy n Happy.

“They introduced us to the fabulous Geraldine Baird very early on. His friendship, enthusiasm and support really touched us and Project Hope, ”said Natalie.

“She in turn introduced us to so many wonderful people who have helped us along our way.”

** Don’t miss the latest Lanarkshire titles. Subscribe to our newsletters here.

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Morning Lookout: Booster FAQs, Progress for Kids and Durbin Rocks on https://semiospectacle.com/morning-lookout-booster-faqs-progress-for-kids-and-durbin-rocks-on/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 16:19:21 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/morning-lookout-booster-faqs-progress-for-kids-and-durbin-rocks-on/ Hello everyone, dear readers. It’s Friday November 19th and we’re looking at partially sunny skies and peaks in the mid-60s. I got my COVID booster Thursday night, and Lookout has both booster shots and younger shots: Grace Stetson got some responses from health workers in Santa Cruz on boosters, including how to get them. Haneen […]]]>

Hello everyone, dear readers. It’s Friday November 19th and we’re looking at partially sunny skies and peaks in the mid-60s.

I got my COVID booster Thursday night, and Lookout has both booster shots and younger shots: Grace Stetson got some responses from health workers in Santa Cruz on boosters, including how to get them. Haneen Zain, meanwhile, inquired about how is the deployment of vax going for 5 to 11 year olds?.

This is far from all we have for you:

Let’s dive in, will you?

County parents line up youth for COVID-19 shots

(Kevin Painchaud / Santa Cruz Belvedere)

Nearly 3,000 children aged 5 to 11 received their first dose of COVID-19 since last week. Haneen Zain of Lookout reported on vaccine progress.

?? LAST WEEK: “We’re going to do our part”: Gault Elementary School organizes its first vaccination clinic for elementary school students (Lookout)

The scoop on COVID boosters

Health worker prepares dose of Janssen COVID-19 vaccine

(Kevin Painchaud / Santa Cruz Belvedere)

Why should you do it? Where should you get it? Should we mix and match? Grace Stetson from Lookout gives the answers here.

?? RELATED: Raise your guard, health officials warn: As the holidays approach, gatherings could trigger the spread of COVID (Lookout)

James Durbin has a full list of upcoming local shows.

Former “American Idol” star James Durbin is raising the bar for his Quiet Riot years and channeling his love for Dio, Iron Maiden and Judas Priest on his latest album – and Santa Cruz fans will have plenty of chances to see it. ‘hear. Lookout collaborator Lucille Tepperman digs here.

?? THROUGHOUT THE LINE: Check out Wallace Baine’s carefully curated list of all the great upcoming events in Santa Cruz

An advertising banner for Lookout membership

After the death of its creator, ‘Zoom Forward’ stays true to its name

Writer and artist Jory Post

Granddaughter Hannah Hutton continues the literary event started by Santa Cruz artist and writer Jory Post. Lookout’s Wallace Baine traces the development of the event and chats with the Friday star writer.

?? MORE FROM WALLACE: Find everything from Santa Cruz’s longest-serving reporter in one place

Café Gratitude update: reduced hours, unrestored jobs

Café Gratitude on Lincoln Street in downtown.

(Mark Conley / Lookout Santa Cruz)

A walkout of around half of Cafe Gratitude’s staff earlier this month doesn’t appear to have been a success. Lookout’s Lily Belli Has The Latest On A Downtown Institution.

?? PREVIOUSLY: Owner and workers face off at longtime vegan Santa Cruz cafe rooted in mindfulness (Lookout)

The best bets have plans for Friday

DJ Mark Farina in action

From downtempo hip-hop and modern dance to comedy, art and bites and beers, Wallace Baine and the BOLO team at Lookout have recommendations on things to do between now and Thanksgiving. Find everything here.

?? SEE THE COMPLETE CALENDAR: BOLO, your place to go for things to do

UC officially drops all undergraduate admission tests

A broken pencil on a standardized test sheet

After removing the SAT and ACT in 2020, the University of California said Thursday it would no longer consider using tests as part of its undergraduate admission process. Get the analysis here from our partners at CalMatters.

?? MORE CU: Speakers hail new deal as “a landmark and transformative achievement” (Lookout)

Around the county …

?? Good Samaritans help a teenager; Scotts Valley Police Arrest Boyfriend (Santa Cruz Sentry)
?? Watsonville Ivy League Project founder honored (The Pajaronian)
?? Residents question need for tree removal on Pine Flat Road (The press banner)
?? Santa Cruz tourism hopes for a rebound during the holidays (KSBW-TV)

And that should be enough to get you ready for Friday. But stay tuned to Lookout – bookmark our website and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram – for everything to come, including another serving of Lily Belli’s Eaters Digest. And you can have it all delivered to your inbox or phone by visiting our Lookout newsletter and text center.

To make sure you’re up to date with everything that is happening in Santa Cruz, consider become a Lookout member. Our content is not possible without the support of the community.

And now onward – have a nice day!

Will mccahill
Santa Cruz lookout



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House censors Arizona Rep Gosar for violent video in rare reprimand https://semiospectacle.com/house-censors-arizona-rep-gosar-for-violent-video-in-rare-reprimand/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 21:41:59 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/house-censors-arizona-rep-gosar-for-violent-video-in-rare-reprimand/ House to vote on censorship of Arizona Rep. Gosar over controversial video WASHINGTON – WASHINGTON (AP) – The House on Wednesday voted to censor Arizona Republican Rep. Paul Gosar for posting an animated video of him killing Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez with a sword, an extraordinary rebuke that put highlight the political tensions testing Washington […]]]>

WASHINGTON (AP) – The House on Wednesday voted to censor Arizona Republican Rep. Paul Gosar for posting an animated video of him killing Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez with a sword, an extraordinary rebuke that put highlight the political tensions testing Washington and the country.

Calling the video a clear threat to the life of a lawmaker, Democrats argued that Gosar’s conduct would not be tolerated in any other workplace – and should not be in Congress.

The vote to censor Gosar, and also to strip him of his committee duties, was approved by a vote of 223-207, almost entirely along party lines.

Republican Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy called the vote an “abuse of power” by Democrats to distract from domestic issues. He said of censorship that a “new standard will continue to be applied in the future,” a signal of potential ramifications for Democratic members in future congresses.

But Democrats said there was nothing political about it.

“These actions demand a response. We cannot let members joke about killing each other,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. “It is both an endangerment of our elected officials and an insult to the institution.”

Ocasio-Cortez herself said in a moving speech: “Our work here matters. Our example matters. Our service makes sense. this country. And this is where we have to draw the line. “

Unrepentant, Gosar rejected what he called the “distortion” that the design was “dangerous or threatening. It was not.”

“I don’t espouse violence against anyone. I never did. It wasn’t my goal to anger anyone,” Gosar said.

He compared himself to Alexander Hamilton, the country’s first Treasury secretary, celebrated in recent years in a Broadway musical, whose vote of no confidence in the House was rejected: “If I have to join Alexander Hamilton, the first no one tried to be censored by this House, so be it, it’s done. “

The move to censor Gosar, one of the harshest punishments the House can inflict, was only the fourth in nearly 40 years – and just the latest example of the heightened tensions that have rocked Congress since the 2020 election and the violent Capitol uprising that followed. .

The decision to go ahead with the effort arose out of Democratic frustration with the House GOP, which refused to publicly reprimand Gosar, who has a long history of inflammatory remarks.

Instead, GOP leaders largely ignored his actions and urged their members to vote against the resolution censoring him. They also warned that the effort was setting a precedent that could come back to haunt Democrats if they find themselves in the minority.

Gosar posted a declaration by email, saying, in part, “President Trump called me his’ warrior ‘for a reason. I fought for America First and against the Democrats’ efforts to destroy this country with open borders, drugs, illegal immigration and human trafficking all tolerated and initiated by the Biden administration. My team has created a short animated video that depicts, in literary form, the scourge of open borders and the people that promote and support him. This is done in a superhero format with good guys and bad guys. He flies through the air. He moves fast. But he doesn’t incite violence. He doesn’t encourage violence.

Representative Matt Gaetz from Florida said, “I would just suggest that we have better things to do on the floor of the House of Representatives than being the Twitter monitors for Twitter.”

The resolution will remove Gosar from two committees: Natural Resources and the Watch and Reform Group, which Ocasio-Cortez also sits on, limiting his ability to shape legislation and meet the needs of voters. He says depictions of violence can foment real violence and endanger the safety of elected officials, citing the Jan.6 attack on the United States Capitol as an example.

Gosar becomes the 24th member of the House to be censored. While it has no practical effect other than to provide a historic footnote that marks a lawmaker’s career, it is the most severe punishment the House can impose unless a expulsion, which requires a two-thirds vote.

Democratic Representative Charles Rangel, the former chairman of the powerful House Ways and Means Committee, was the last to receive the reprimand in 2010 for financial misconduct.

It would also be the second time this year that the House has initiated the removal of a GOP lawmaker from a designated committee, the first being Georgia’s Marjorie Taylor Greene.

Gosar, a six-term congressman, posted the video over a week ago with a note saying, “Anime fans out there? The approximately 90-second video was an edited version of a Japanese anime clip, interspersed with shots of border patrol agents and migrants on the southern border of the United States.

During a section of about 10 seconds, animated characters whose faces had been replaced by Gosar, Greene, and Representative Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., Were shown fighting other animated characters. Another made to resemble Ocasio-Cortez is struck by Gosar’s character in the neck with a sword. The video also shows him attacking President Joe Biden.

Ocasio-Cortez, DN.Y., whose receipt of repeated death threats has forced her to spend thousands of dollars on security, said Gosar had not apologized to her. She singled out McCarthy for failing to convict Gosar.

“What is so hard to say that is wrong?” Ocasio-Cortez told the House Wednesday. “It’s not about me. It’s not about Representative Gosar. But it’s about what we are willing to accept.”

Representative Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., Was one of the few Republicans who said he would vote to censor Gosar.

“We need to hold accountable those members who incite or glorify violence, who propagate and perpetuate dangerous plots. Failure to do so will bring us one step closer to the reality of this fantasy violence,” Kinzinger tweeted.

This is not the first brush of controversy for Gosar, who was first elected in the 2010 tea party wave. He has been criticized several times by his own siblings, six of whom appeared in campaign ads supporting his Democratic opponent in 2018.

Earlier this year, Gosar sought to form an America First Caucus with other extremist Republican members of the House that aimed to promote “Anglo-Saxon political traditions” while warning that mass immigration endangered “l ‘unique identity’ of the United States. He has made appearances at right-wing fringe events, including a rally in London in 2018 for a jailed British activist who has repeatedly broadcast anti-Muslim views and a rally in Florida last February hosted by Nick Fuentes, a Internet personality who promoted white supremacist beliefs.

He also portrayed a woman shot dead by Capitol Police during the Capitol attack as a martyr, claiming that she had been “executed”. And he falsely suggested that a 2017 white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia was organized by “the left” and supported by billionaire George Soros, a major backer of liberal causes who is became the center of anti-Semitic conspiracy theories.

___

Associated Press editors Alan Fram and Farnoush Amiri contributed to this report.

Related stories:

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___

Associated Press editors Alan Fram and Farnoush Amiri contributed to this report.


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Morning Mail: Joyce laughs at Cop26 chair, West Sydney planning failure, stockpiling winter woolens | https://semiospectacle.com/morning-mail-joyce-laughs-at-cop26-chair-west-sydney-planning-failure-stockpiling-winter-woolens/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 19:55:00 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/morning-mail-joyce-laughs-at-cop26-chair-west-sydney-planning-failure-stockpiling-winter-woolens/ gHello. Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce said the government was happy with Australia’s current emissions targets for 2030 and had attempted the Cop26 presidency. And experts have called for more climate-sensitive housing developments across the country to mitigate rising temperatures and other impacts of climate change. Nationals leader Barnaby Joyce said his party failed to […]]]>

gHello. Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce said the government was happy with Australia’s current emissions targets for 2030 and had attempted the Cop26 presidency. And experts have called for more climate-sensitive housing developments across the country to mitigate rising temperatures and other impacts of climate change.

Nationals leader Barnaby Joyce said his party failed to sign the final COP26 climate summit communiqué and mocked summit chairman Alok Sharma for his emotional reaction to the weakening language on coal. “The Nationals did not sign it. I didn’t sign it, ”Joyce told ABC of the Cop26 pact signed by the Australian government on Sunday. “We are happy with our goals… we said we would not change our goals for 2030.” Joyce ridiculed Sharma for getting emotional when telling vulnerable nations he was “deeply sorry” for how the process went. ‘was unrolled.

Climate change impacts should inform design decisions in new housing developments in Australia, experts say. Houses built to the fence with dark roofs and tiny backyards, like many in western Sydney, are leaving their owners at the mercy of the climate crisis, experts say now is about time to insist on climate-sensitive developments. “Australians deserve a better future and if we don’t design for climate change housing will ultimately be uninhabitable and we know it’s worse in deprived areas,” said Davina Rooney, CEO of the Green Building Council.

The explosion outside a hospital in Liverpool, England has been declared a terrorist incident and authorities have raised the level of the terrorist threat in the UK to a serious level. A taxi caught fire outside Liverpool Women’s Hospital just before 11 a.m. on Remembrance Sunday, leaving one dead and another seriously injured. A male passenger was pronounced dead at the scene, while the taxi driver managed to escape and has since been released from the hospital. Initial police findings indicate that the improvised explosive device was built by the deceased passenger.

Australia

One of the 20 proposed rules for federal election debates is that they be provided to all networks. Photograph: Mike Bowers / The Guardian

Independent Australian debates commission could mark the end of ‘senseless debates about debates’. Twenty principles have been proposed, including that one of the three debates should take place in a regional venue – and that there be no device to record public approval and disapproval in real time.

Residents of the town of Nundle have accused the NSW government of double standards, calling for it to impose the same community consent rules for existing renewable development proposals as for new state renewable energy zones. They argue that a wind farm project goes against a mandate that “renewable energies are developed where regional communities want”.

Victorian government to water down controversial pandemic legislation after 11th hour negotiations. Crossbench MPs secured a number of amendments to the bill, including reducing the proposed hefty fines and granting Victorians the right to appeal detention orders to the Victoria Civil and Administrative Court.

The NT on Monday recorded two new cases of Covid, one of which was a 43-year-old fully vaccinated man in a remote community. This triggered a lockdown of the greater Katherine area and the Robinson River.

The world

Trump's ally Steve Bannon surrenders to authorities.
Trump’s ally Steve Bannon surrenders to authorities. Photograph: Pete Marovich / EPA

Steve Bannon surrendered to FBI after being charged with contempt of Congress for defying subpoena for attack on Capitol Hill. Bannon faces two counts of criminal contempt: one for refusing to appear for a deposition in Congress and the other for refusing to provide documents in response to the committee’s summons.

EU decided on new sanctions against Belarus targeting “everyone involved” in the border crisis, where thousands of people are stuck in makeshift camps in freezing weather.

Nine-year-old boy became the youngest to die injuries sustained in a wave of crowds at the Astroworld music festival in Texas.

Recommended reading

Latrell Mitchell led the Indigenous All Stars' battle cry against the Maori Kiwis last year.
Latrell Mitchell led the Indigenous All Stars’ battle cry against the Maori Kiwis last year. Photograph: Dave Hunt / AAP

Larissa Behrendt’s documentary Araatika: Rise Up! follows a man’s mission to create a native Australian equivalent of the haka to perform in NRL matches. Luke Buckmaster says it’s “a warm and compelling watch populated by nice people pursuing a valuable business… Just when you feel you’ve got the tone and the trajectory of Araatika: Rise Up! tied up, he has a habit of throwing you something beautiful unexpectedly or stopping you ”.

The seasons have changed, we are out of containment and almost at the end of spring. Hopefully we can pull off our heaviest coats for the summer, but before you do, we asked experts for their advice on how best to store your coats so that they are in peak condition for them next winter. “Wrapping your woolen coat in a lightweight cotton fabric ensures that your wool retains its new look,” is advice from Australian Wool Innovation CEO John Roberts.

The great Australian literary Gerald Murnane has published his latest book – a collection of essays on his experience of reading all of his own books in order. “The Last Letter to a Reader essays are neither literary critiques nor memoirs,” writes Emmett Stinson. “Rather, they ruminate on unexpected connections between the specific books, ideas and life experiences that informed his writing.”

Listen

When farmer Will Picker broke his back on his NSW farm, there was no cell phone reception, so he had to crawl 1 mile for help. MPs are now under pressure to sign a private member’s bill to force Australian telecoms operators to improve spotty mobile coverage and poor customer service. In today’s full article, Laura Murphy-Oates talks to Will and her partner Hannah Sparks about the real – and sometimes dangerous – cost of Australia’s poor mobile performance.

Whole story

Australia’s problem with cellphones

Full Story is Guardian Australia’s daily news podcast. Subscribe for free on Apple podcasts, Spotify or any other podcasting application.

sport

Roger Federer will almost certainly miss the Australian Open for the second year in a row as he recovers from a third knee surgery in 18 months.

Media overview

NSW Police requested apprehended violence order against the adoptive parents of William Tyrrell on behalf of a child related to the missing boy, report the Sydney Morning Herald. One of the country’s largest landowners, Rallen Australia, has took legal action in the Northern Territory against energy giant Santos for fracking projects in the gas-rich Beetaloo basin, according to the australian.

And if you’ve read this far …

France changed the color of its flag last July – but no one noticed it. Emmanuel Macron’s office darkened the blue of the French flags floating around the Elysee Palace to bring the tricolor in keeping with the way he presented himself after the French Revolution.

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