Literary film – Semiospectacle http://semiospectacle.com/ Mon, 03 Oct 2022 04:00:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://semiospectacle.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Literary film – Semiospectacle http://semiospectacle.com/ 32 32 Amazon Prime’s The Rings of Power: A Show to Ruin Them All https://semiospectacle.com/amazon-primes-the-rings-of-power-a-show-to-ruin-them-all/ Mon, 03 Oct 2022 00:43:40 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/amazon-primes-the-rings-of-power-a-show-to-ruin-them-all/ Based on the writings of JRR Tolkien, rings of power began its first season on Amazon Prime in September. The release of the fantasy series The Lord of the Rings: Rings of Power, the most expensive television series in history, was unveiled with great fanfare. Now, one rather wishes that, like the One Ring that […]]]>

Based on the writings of JRR Tolkien, rings of power began its first season on Amazon Prime in September.

The release of the fantasy series The Lord of the Rings: Rings of Power, the most expensive television series in history, was unveiled with great fanfare. Now, one rather wishes that, like the One Ring that brought so much doom in the books, it had never been created in the first place.

The Lord of the Rings – The Rings of Power

The series sets out to explore the second age of Middle-earth, the fantasy world written by JRR Tolkien (1892-1973) inhabited by men, elves, dwarves and small humanoids known as Hobbits. There are several storylines that revolve around the forging of magic rings, the rise and fall of the kingdom of Numenor, and the last alliance of elves and men.

This reviewer was lucky enough to be a teenage witness to the popular The Lord of the Rings film trilogy (2001-2003) directed by Peter Jackson, which recounts the events of Tolkien’s Third Age of Middle-earth and the destruction of the cursed One Ring. I say teenage because it was derided by Tolkien’s late son, Christopher, at the time as “an action movie for 15-25 year olds”. That this was also an “evisceration of the book” became apparent later on in the reading, but there was much to forgive.

Fast forward 20 years and rings of power it’s also action, a literary evisceration… but no age group seems inclined to defend it this time. On the contrary, many people are truly upset and outraged. Not only is it incredibly boring, but it suffers from sophomore writing, one-dimensional characters, and contrived plot points.

As of this writing, a top review site reveals an audience score of 38%, with professional reviewers giving it 84%. A veritable cottage industry has sprung up on the free video-sharing website YouTube, with content creators “hating to watch” or laughing at the show.

Amazon felt compelled to remove thousands of negative reviews on its Amazon Prime streaming platform, as well as issue an official statement opposing the “relentless racism” directed at its comrades of color. The suggestion that the complaints are essentially racist is belied by the fact that Dragon Houseanother racially diverse fantasy series released at the same time on HBO, received no such backlash.

The series undoubtedly touched a nerve, which says more about the current state of cinema and society than anything Tolkien is responsible for. The fact that it was produced by the company owned by Jeff Bezos, the second richest person in the world, generates schadenfreude from some, but for most there is a feeling of disappointment and frustration.

Young people and those who remember the Jackson trilogy are now navigating a world much more charged with instability and anxiety. World leaders are on a nuclear tightrope, there are historic levels of social inequality, precarious work, and more. Art and especially cinema are undoubtedly considered a lifeline.

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Movie review: THE GOOD HOUSE https://semiospectacle.com/movie-review-the-good-house/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 20:25:00 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/movie-review-the-good-house/ By ABBIE BERNSTEIN / Editor Posted: September 30, 2022 / 1:25 p.m. THE GOOD HOME | ©2022 Lionsgate Evaluation: R Stars: Sigourney Weaver, Kevin Kline, Morena Baccarin, Rob Delaney, David Rasche, Beverly D’Angelo, Paul Guilfoyle, Kathryn Erbe, Kelly AuCoin, Georgia Lyman, Rebecca Henderson, Molly Brown Writers: Thomas Bezucha and Maya Forbes & Wally Wolodarsky, based […]]]>

By ABBIE BERNSTEIN / Editor

Posted: September 30, 2022 / 1:25 p.m.

THE GOOD HOME | ©2022 Lionsgate

Evaluation: R
Stars: Sigourney Weaver, Kevin Kline, Morena Baccarin, Rob Delaney, David Rasche, Beverly D’Angelo, Paul Guilfoyle, Kathryn Erbe, Kelly AuCoin, Georgia Lyman, Rebecca Henderson, Molly Brown
Writers: Thomas Bezucha and Maya Forbes & Wally Wolodarsky, based on the novel by Ann Leary
Directors: Maya Forbes and Wally Wolodarsky
Distributer: Lionsgate/Road Attractions
Release date: September 30, 2022

THE RIGHT HOME takes place (mostly) in the present, but it feels like a lot of other literary adaptations, especially from the 70s and 80s.

In effect, THE RIGHT HOME was adapted from Ann Leary’s novel by the film’s directors, Maya Forbes and Wally Wolodarsky, who wrote the screenplay with Thomas Bezucha. It has a slightly folksy feel, stunning Atlantic coastal scenery and a terrific Sigourney Weaver star ride.

Weaver plays Hildy Good, a real estate agent in the upscale and quaint New England village of Wendover, Massachusetts. Hildy’s family has lived in Wendover for nearly three hundred years. Her ancestor, Sarah Good, was one of the first women tried in Salem as a witch.

There’s a slight sense of magic about Hildy, who can find out things about another person just by passing her hand over theirs. Then again, Hildy’s profession has taught her to read other people pretty well anyway.

Hildy is divorced. His eldest daughter Tess (Rebecca Henderson) is happily married and lives in town with her husband and grandson. his younger daughter Emily (Molly Brown) is a struggling artist, living—with Hildy’s financial help—in Brooklyn.

Outwardly, things seem to be going well. Even when Hildy confides in us, breaking the fourth wall, she puts up a shredding front. But she has problems. A big problem is that his ex-employee, Wendy, stole a lot of Hildy’s real estate clients.

But a bigger one, which Hildy won’t admit to herself, is her secret drinking. Hildy’s daughters and ex-husband (David Rasche) stage an intervention and send her to rehab; they think she lives sober.

A newcomer to the area, artist Rebecca (Morena Baccarin), befriends Hildy. Then there’s the case of entrepreneur Frank Getchell (Kevin Kline), Hildy’s old high school flame, still in town.

All of this provides enough comedic and dramatic material to keep us gently engaged. It’s at least partly because Weaver is such a good company; we love spending time with her Hildy. That’s partly because the writing never puts a nasty vibe into Hildy’s frustration, and more because Weaver gives Hildy such wit and awareness. Weaver makes it clear that Hildy knows, under her denial, that something is wrong with her drinking; she just can’t get past the need to feel better in the moment.

The filmmakers are also careful to be proportionate. They and Hildy can clearly see that some people around her have far bigger problems than hers. Jokes are never too harsh, allowing them to be humorous, but never hilarious. * Kline is well into the kind of role no one would expect him to play, a salt-of-the-earth worker, and Baccarin is seductive and slightly ominous as Rebecca.

THE RIGHT HOME does not present itself as the hottest property on the market. However, it is beautiful and comfortable, a pleasant place to spend just under two hours in pleasant company.

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The True Story of Arthur Miller’s Relationship With Marilyn Monroe https://semiospectacle.com/the-true-story-of-arthur-millers-relationship-with-marilyn-monroe/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 23:00:06 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/the-true-story-of-arthur-millers-relationship-with-marilyn-monroe/ Marilyn Monroe’s life story is making headlines again thanks to new biopic Blondstarring Ana De Armas as the Hollywood bombshell. Blond, written and directed by Andrew Dominik, was adapted from the 2000 novel of the same name by Joyce Carol Oates, and the film premiered at the 2022 Venice Film Festival, receiving a 14-minute standing […]]]>

Marilyn Monroe’s life story is making headlines again thanks to new biopic Blondstarring Ana De Armas as the Hollywood bombshell.

Blond, written and directed by Andrew Dominik, was adapted from the 2000 novel of the same name by Joyce Carol Oates, and the film premiered at the 2022 Venice Film Festival, receiving a 14-minute standing ovation.

Some reviews weren’t as rave, given the graphic focus on the harrowing and traumatic abuse Monroe – née Norma Jeane Mortenson – endured throughout her life in the film, not to mention the fact that the sheer fiction is continually woven into the narrative. However, some parts of Monroe’s life are set in stone, like her three marriages.

Her first husband, whom she married when she was 16, was James Dougherty, a factory worker. Her second husband was baseball star Joe DiMaggio (played by Bobby Cannavale in the film). The relationship was abusive and their marriage ended a year later in 1955. But arguably her best-known romance was with Arthur Miller, the playwright, which lasted for six years until 1961. They were initially seen as a strange couple; the literary great and her glamorous movie star partner, but it ended up being one of the biggest love affairs of her life.

New York Daily News ArchiveGetty Images

How did the romance start?

In the early 1950s, Arthur Miller (played by Adrien Brody in Blond) was married to Mary Slattery, and Monroe was at the height of her stardom, appearing in niagara and Men prefer blondes. According to Donald Spoto in Marilyn Monroe: biographyMiller and Monroe were first introduced around this time by director Elia Kazan.

In 1955, the couple was in the throes of a full-fledged affair, which became serious after their separation from their spouses. However, in McCarthy’s witch hunt against Communists in the United States, the FBI was investigating Miller and reporting him to the House Un-American Activities Committee, which led to him being subpoenaed. One gossip columnist called Monroe “a darling of the left-leaning intelligentsia, several of whom are listed as red fronters.” This infuriated studio bosses, who warned Monroe that she had to end the relationship, but she refused. The FBI also opened a file on Monroe.

Meanwhile, Monroe, through a series of letters, revealed her true feelings of love for Miller and explained why she chose to stand by his side. As recorded in Fragments: poems, intimate notes, Letters she wrote: “I am so concerned about Arthur’s protection. I love him – and he is the only person – human being I have ever known that I can love not only as a man who practically pulls me out of my senses – but he is the only person – as than any other human being who I trust as much as I trust myself.

According The mirror, Miller’s biographer, Professor Bigsby, said: “He was absolutely bowled over by her. It was definitely a love story. One of his love letters was an almost teenage outpouring of love.”

On June 29, 1956, the couple snuck into the Westchester County Courthouse in White Plains, New York, where they were married in a quick four-minute civil ceremony by Judge Seymour Rabinowitz.

The full Jewish wedding, for which Monroe converted, took place a few days later, on July 1, at Miller’s agent, Kay Brown’s home. Monroe, who never knew who her real father was, was given away by her acting teacher, Lee Strasberg, and the couple gave each other wedding rings that read “Now is forever.” Variety later celebrates the event with a story titled: “Egghead Weds Hourglass”.

However, an intense filming schedule and health issues began to take their toll on Monroe. She had a miscarriage the same year, then, after taking 18 months off to focus on her relationship with Miller, she suffered an ectopic pregnancy in 1957 and miscarried again. In Marilyn: passion and paradoxLois Banner describes how, around this time, Monroe was hospitalized briefly after taking an overdose of barbiturates.

Miller and Monroe did what many considered dangerous and mixed business with pleasure. Miller ended up writing or rewriting a number of Monroe productions, such as the 1960s Make lovee and the last film in which she appeared, 1961 The misfits.

The disappearance of their love story

The cracks in their marriage were beginning to show, and on the set of Make love, Monroe reportedly had an affair with her co-star, Yves Montand. During this time, Miller had apparently struck up a relationship with photographer Inge Morath, whom he later married and had children with.

The writing was on the wall when, in a scene straight out of a Hollywood movie, and according to The story today, Monroe found Miller’s notebook open on a table. Like seeing a car accident, she was unable to look away: “She discovered that he was disappointed in her, feared that his own creativity was threatened by this miserable, dependent, unpredictable wreck he had married and seriously regretted the union. Marilyn told friends that he also wrote: “The only one I will ever love is my daughter”. vanity lounge later said, “One of her greatest fears, of disappointing those she loved, had come true.”

The couple officially separated after the filming of The misfits and obtained a Mexican divorce – a divorce obtained in Mexico rather than the United States, because it was easier, faster and cheaper, and could be done away from the prying lens of paparazzi cameras.

Monroe died shortly thereafter, aged 36, of a barbiturate overdose on August 5, 1962. Miller did not attend her funeral. In an essay written by Miller at the time – according to The Independent – he explained why: “Instead of going to the funeral to have my picture taken, I decided to stay at home and let the mourners finish the mockery… It was destroyed by a lot of things and some of those things are you. And some of those things destroy you. Destroy you now. Now that you’re standing there, crying and gaping, glad it’s not you who walks into the earth, glad it’s that lovely girl you finally killed. He died aged 89 in 2005.

Blond streams on Netflix starting September 23.

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In Search of a Smile: Reconsidering Media Trauma Narratives https://semiospectacle.com/in-search-of-a-smile-reconsidering-media-trauma-narratives/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 20:07:28 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/in-search-of-a-smile-reconsidering-media-trauma-narratives/ For you a thousand times more. This emblematic sentence of Khaled Hosseini The kite runner is well known to readers of contemporary fiction. The novel, a New York Times bestseller, has become a modern classic, garnering enough traction to secure the Broadway debut of its stage adaptation last July. While deserving of its fame, the […]]]>

For you a thousand times more.

This emblematic sentence of Khaled Hosseini The kite runner is well known to readers of contemporary fiction. The novel, a New York Times bestseller, has become a modern classic, garnering enough traction to secure the Broadway debut of its stage adaptation last July. While deserving of its fame, the novel’s content and popularity fit within a complex trope regarding Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) narratives.

In literature, film, and television, it seems that the majority of popular stories centered on characters of color in the United States focus primarily on sadness. Often these stories focus on a combination of generational trauma, war, poverty, abuse, or identity struggle that leaves the story with a dark cloud hanging above. Think of Min Jin Lee Pachinko, At Mohsin Hamid’s West exit, or at Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie purple hibiscus– all the novels where suffering is at the center of the plot.

Of course, these authors and their works are critically acclaimed for a reason: their writing prowess has allowed them to touch the hearts and minds of millions of readers around the world. They have also contributed to the diversification of the media – we are living in an unprecedented period of representation. What’s more, there’s no denying that the inclusion of hardship complements stories: it adds depth and richness to any plot, and character development often parallels the experience of friction. Sharing stories that address challenges unique to communities of color also raises awareness of the realities of BIPOC experiences in a still incredibly white media space. So these stories should and must be told, but a problem arises when they are the only ones to get attention.

The reality is that publishers and film companies generally won’t give a project the green flag unless they believe the proposed story is profitable. But what’s considered “profitable” is based on what’s proven: what kinds of products have been critically successful in the past? As far as BIPOC-centric stories go, this has proven itself and is a trauma tale. Famous authors of color — your Toni Morrisons, Amy Tans and Jhumpa Lahiris — wrote extraordinary books that often focused on trauma and are now modern classics. Their success, while deserved, established a legacy of traumatic narratives that publishing and production companies perpetuate for the sake of profit. Now, when audiences even try to think of a story about people of color that is simultaneously about joy, many find themselves at a dead end.

For stories about people of color, trauma became tied to profitability. The continued dominance of trauma as the dominant narrative has set a dangerous precedent for what sells and what doesn’t. For example, Lee Pachinko follows a Korean family from their roots in Korea to their new home in Japan. Documenting the experiences of different descendants of the same family, the novel examines generational trauma, as parents, children and grandchildren grapple with immigration, discrimination and poverty. Although this novel does not specifically focus on an American experience, its popularity with American audiences speaks to the idea that sadness is necessary to become a bestseller for a BIPOC-centric story. Conflict, pain and misfortune drive the most popular type of storytelling, pushing the lightest works out of the spotlight, while white-centric media still sees a plethora of sunny romantic comedies, sci-fi adventures and fantastic wonderlands. This further raises the question: why is this formula successful in the first place? In an increasingly diverse nation, why are so many stories about people of color still so deeply sad?

The mainstream portrayal of trauma-centric narratives paints a misguided picture that happiness is rare, if not unattainable, for people of color. The result is a one-dimensional representation of life experiences, suggesting that BIPOC can only be characterized by trauma or negative experiences. While reading stories about racialized prejudice can be beneficial, it should be an active choice. It should be avoidable.

But with the prominence of trauma stories, it is difficult for people of color to access media that is both representative and joyful. Fiction and storytelling can often be used as a means of escape, a break from the unpleasant aspects of life, but the pervasiveness of trauma narratives makes this difficult for people of color, who find their few media choices representative around the harsh realities they already know so well.

But stories don’t need to conform to the trauma narrative mold to gain popularity, as many other BIPOC-centric stories have already proven. by Kevin Kwan boobies rich asian is an example of a feel-good story that achieved both literary and box office success. ABC Abbott Elementary, Hulu’s Rummy, and those of Netflix I have never are some recent examples of lighter BIPOC stories that still achieved critical acclaim and popularity. While these stories incorporate the harsh realities that come with racial marginalization, they are not solely grounded in trauma, but maintain a comedic and fun tone, allowing BIPOC to see themselves portrayed while laughing. These works, however, remain exceptions among the stories surrounding people of color. The lighter-toned BIPOC stories are still emerging in the literary and film worlds and often find themselves overshadowed by their heavier counterparts.

Although BIPOC’s groundbreaking narratives may have involved the main characters experiencing disaster and dealing with historical abuse, the groundwork for increased representation in the media has already been established. There is now an opportunity to diversify the types of stories used to achieve this representation. Communities of color deserve to be represented in stories of success, love and happiness.

While it remains important to draw attention to the real injustices these communities face, people of color have the right to be represented to the fullest extent possible. They deserve to be imagined thriving and that the media industries value their happy selves as much as their sad half. Better representation means new opportunities to dream, to imagine a happier world where their lives are more than the negative. It is essential to move beyond the profitable mold of trauma stories and create enough stories that people of color see themselves loved, laughed and smiled a thousand times over.

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Hilary Mantel – an early death https://semiospectacle.com/hilary-mantel-an-early-death/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 02:35:37 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/hilary-mantel-an-early-death/ When the Queen died a fortnight ago it was widely assumed that the perfect writer to describe both her death and its aftermath was Hilary Mantel, but now that will never be the case. Mantel died yesterday of a stroke at the age of 70, leaving behind a unique legacy in transatlantic literature, not only […]]]>

When the Queen died a fortnight ago it was widely assumed that the perfect writer to describe both her death and its aftermath was Hilary Mantel, but now that will never be the case. Mantel died yesterday of a stroke at the age of 70, leaving behind a unique legacy in transatlantic literature, not only as someone whose landmark novels about royalty in the Tudor era sold to millions, but also as an acute chronicler of our time. It’s not for nothing that his most controversial short story, The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher, is a subversive…

When the Queen died a fortnight ago it was widely assumed that the perfect writer to describe both her death and its aftermath was Hilary Mantel, but now that will never be the case. Mantel died yesterday of a stroke at the age of 70, leaving behind a unique legacy in transatlantic literature, not only as someone whose landmark novels about royalty in the Tudor era sold to millions, but also as an acute chronicler of our time. Not for nothing is his most controversial short story, The assassination of Margaret Thatcher, a subversive account of what might have happened if a woman she felt a “boiling detestation” for had been killed in 1983.

Now, Mantel’s death has robbed readers not only of an insightful — and arguably controversial — account of kingship’s last stand, but many more books to come. His Hall of Wolves trilogy has been adapted for both television and the stage and won him the Booker Prize twice. It is widely regarded as a series of high-level literary novels that appeal to people who generally avoid the genre of difficult, intellectually penetrating books in which Mantel specializes. She was the female equivalent of a Jonathan Franzen or a Martin Amis – or, if you will, a less controversial Philip Roth – in that she was able to write uncompromising novels that sold out in the genre. numbers that much less genteel airport readings usually do. And she retained her intellectual integrity while doing it.

However, I always felt that something had changed in Mantel’s career. His first novels, anti-Catholic from 1989 Fludd and 1994 A change of climate, were critically acclaimed. The New York Times described the latter as one of the best books of the year and called it “intelligent, astringent and wonderfully moving fiction”. But they did not transcend the commercial boundaries of literary fiction. It was only when she published Hall of Wolves in 2009, at the age of 56, she became a literary superstar, and her fortunes changed accordingly. She had been a respected and admired writer, but widely known only to a coterie in literary circles on the East Coast and in Britain’s big cities. She was now a brand, whose books could be found for sale in convenience stores as well as in high-end literary establishments.

Mantel has always had an ambivalent relationship with fame. On the one hand, she participated willingly in all the documentaries and interviews and general circus that successful writers are supposed to lend themselves to, even accepting a femininity in 2014. On the other hand, she was a socialist who openly criticized the Church Catholic as “not an institution for respectable people.” She said of the British monarchy: “The whole phenomenon of the monarchy may be irrational, but that does not mean that when we look at it we have to behave like spectators in Bedlam. Cheerful curiosity can easily turn into cruelty. She described the current Princess of Wales, Kate Middleton, as a “showcase model with no personality”.

Mantel was often criticized by the right-wing press for such remarks – perhaps ironically, she was the Spectator‘s film critic for a time, quitting the job in 1991 – but she was never afraid to speak her mind. This refreshing individuality of thought is part of why she was such a popular novelist in the best sense of the word.

Mantel’s sudden death robs English literature of one of its most distinctive and fascinating voices, and it will be much mourned. But the canon of writing she leaves behind will be remembered for decades, if not centuries, long after the squabbles and confusing arguments that took place during her lifetime have crumbled into nothingness. And that, you can imagine, is what she would have wanted.

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Bette Midler, Ron Livingston, Aaron Dominguez and Rish Shah Among 12 Other Amazon Rom-Com Actors – Deadline https://semiospectacle.com/bette-midler-ron-livingston-aaron-dominguez-and-rish-shah-among-12-other-amazon-rom-com-actors-deadline/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 18:15:00 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/bette-midler-ron-livingston-aaron-dominguez-and-rish-shah-among-12-other-amazon-rom-com-actors-deadline/ EXCLUSIVE: The cast of the Amazon Studios romantic comedy Sitting in the bars with a cake grows by 12 with the addition of Bette Midler (Hocus Pocus), Ron Livingstone (the flash), Maia Mitchell (good problem), Aaron Dominguez (Only murders in the building), Rish Shah (Ms. Marvel), and Odessa A’zion (hellraiser). Martha Kelly, Adina Porter, Navid […]]]>

EXCLUSIVE: The cast of the Amazon Studios romantic comedy Sitting in the bars with a cake grows by 12 with the addition of Bette Midler (Hocus Pocus), Ron Livingstone (the flash), Maia Mitchell (good problem), Aaron Dominguez (Only murders in the building), Rish Shah (Ms. Marvel), and Odessa A’zion (hellraiser).

Martha Kelly, Adina Porter, Navid Negahban, Simone Recasner, Will Ropp and Charlie Morgan Patton
Katie Pengra/Diana Ragland/Bjoern Kommerell/Daniel Matallana/Getty/Jenn Kilbourne

Martha Kelly (Euphoria), Adina Porter (American Horror Story: Cult), Navid Negahban (The old man), Simone Recasner (The big jump), Will Ropp (The consequences), and Charlie Morgan Patton (Jesus revolution).

Details about the characters they will play are under wraps.

Sitting in bars with cake begins production next month in Los Angeles.

Based on a true story, Sitting in bars with cake follows a quiet young woman who is unlucky in love and discovers an unlikely lover when she bakes a cake for her best friend’s birthday and brings it to a bar, only to be invaded by men. She thinks it’s a fluke, but her friend convinces her to commit to making cakes and taking them to bars for a year, with the goal of finding true love. The life of the shy young woman then opens up in a way she could not have imagined.

Trish Sie is directing the film from a screenplay by Audrey Shulman adapted from her blog and the book of the same name. Sitting in bars with cake is produced by Susan Cartsonis of Resonate Entertainment, Brent Emery and Suzanne Farwell, and Nick Moceri of All Night Diner. Shahidi and Teri Simpson are executive producers. Clément Bauer is co-producer.

The Amazon original film will stream on Prime Video in more than 240 countries and territories around the world upon release.

Midler is replaced by CAA; Livingston is replaced by UTA; Mitchell is replaced by WME and Anonymous Content; Dominguez is replaced by Innovative Artists, Alexander White Agency, Authentic Talent and Literary Management and Goodman, Genow, Schenkman; A’zion is replaced by Buchwald, Luber Roklin, Doyle Rice, and Yorn Levine Krintzman Rubinstein, et al.

Kelly is replaced by UTA and Brillstein Entertainment Partners; Porter is replaced by TalentWorks and Bamboo Management; Negahban is replaced by innovative artists; Recasner is replaced by Innovative Artists and Vickery Management, Ropp is replaced by The Gersh Agency, Corner Booth Entertainment and Felker, Toczek, Suddleson, Abramson LLP.; Patton is replaced by APA and Authentic Talent and Literary Management.

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Passages of this week | Seattle weather https://semiospectacle.com/passages-of-this-week-seattle-weather/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 03:00:02 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/passages-of-this-week-seattle-weather/ Irene Papas, 96, a Greek actress who starred in films such as ‘Z’, ‘Zorba the Greek’ and ‘The Guns of Navarone’ but achieved the greatest success of her career playing the heroines of Greek tragedy, is died Wednesday. In “Zorba the Greek” (1964), with Anthony Quinn, she was a Greek widow stoned by her fellow […]]]>

Irene Papas, 96, a Greek actress who starred in films such as ‘Z’, ‘Zorba the Greek’ and ‘The Guns of Navarone’ but achieved the greatest success of her career playing the heroines of Greek tragedy, is died Wednesday.

In “Zorba the Greek” (1964), with Anthony Quinn, she was a Greek widow stoned by her fellow citizens because of her choice of lover. In Costa-Gavras’ Oscar-winning political thriller “Z” (1969), set in the Greek city of Thessaloniki, she plays the widow of Yves Montand, who conjures up the film’s meaning with one last distressed gaze out to sea.

But during the same decade, Papas made a name for himself in Greek film versions of classic plays, often directed by fellow countryman Michael Cacoyannis, who also directed “Zorba.” She played the main characters in “Antigone” (1961), Sophocles’ story of a woman who pays dearly after fighting for her brother’s right to an honorable burial; and in “Electra” (1962), in which she and her brother plot matricide. She was also the mother of Electra, Clytemnestra, in “Iphigénie” (1977), the drama of a girl offered as a human sacrifice.

Ken Starr, January 76, the independent attorney whose investigation uncovered a White House sex scandal that shocked the nation and led to the impeachment of President Bill Clinton for lying under oath and obstructing justice, died on Tuesday in a Houston hospital. His wife, Alice Starr, said he died following surgery, but gave no further details.

For a time, Starr was a household name, and his investigation into Clinton’s affair with a former White House intern, Monica Lewinsky, propelled issues of gender, morality, responsibility and ideology to the center of American life for over a year. His investigation tested the limits of the Constitution as it prompted the first impeachment of a president in 130 years and marked Clinton’s legacy and his own. Starr has made headlines again for representing billionaire financier Jeffrey Epstein when he was charged with sex crimes against young girls in Florida. He also mentored Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Jean-Luc Godard, 91, the iconic “enfant terrible” of the French New Wave who revolutionized popular cinema in 1960 with his first feature film, “A bout de souffle”, and figured for years among the most influential directors in the world of cinema , died on Tuesday at his home in Rolle, Switzerland. His longtime legal adviser, Patrick Jeanneret, said Godard died by assisted suicide, having suffered from “multiple disabling pathologies”.

In a long career that began in the 1950s as a film critic, Godard was perhaps the most innovative director among New Wave filmmakers who rewrote the rules of camera, sound and of storytelling – rebelling against an earlier tradition of more stereotypical storytelling. “A bout de souffle”, with Jean-Paul Belmondo and Jean Seberg, is perhaps still the best known of his works.

Ramsey Lewis, 87, a jazz pianist who unexpectedly became a pop star when his recording of “The ‘In’ Crowd” reached the Top 10 in 1965 – and who remained musically active for more than half a century after that – died Monday at his home in Chicago. The cause was not available.

Lewis was well known in jazz circles, but little known elsewhere when he and his trio (Eldee Young on bass and Redd Holt on drums) recorded a live album in May 1965 which included an instrumental version of “The ‘In ‘Crowd’. It peaked at number five on the Billboard Hot 100 and won Lewis the first of his three Grammy Awards. (The others were for the 1966 album track “Hold It Right There” and a 1973 re-recording of “Hang On Sloopy”.)

Javier Marias, 70 years old, the most prestigious Spanish novelist of the last half-century, died on September 11 in Madrid. Spanish news agency EFE reported that Marías died from a lung infection. Marías wrote 15 novels, translations and collections of her newspaper columns, including “Corazón tan blanco” (“Heart So White”), “Todas las almas” (“All Souls”) and “Mañana en la batalla piensa en mí” (“Tomorrow in battle think of me”).

He was considered for years Spain’s leading candidate to win the Nobel Prize in Literature since Camilo José Cela received the honor in 1989. Marías was elected to the Royal Academy of Spain, the highest literary authority and linguistics of the country, in 2006. Winner of several international fiction awards, he was professor of Spanish literature and translation at Oxford and at Wellesley College in Massachusetts in the 1980s.

William Klein, 96, an American photographer whose innovative style of portraiture strongly influenced fashion and street photography in the second half of the 20th century, died on September 10 in Paris. In 1954 Klein turned her attention from painting to photography after meeting Alexander Liberman, the artistic director of Vogue, and began a 10-year collaboration with the magazine. During this period, he created a groundbreaking photographic diary of his native New York, titled “Life is Good and Good for You in New York.” The book showcased Klein’s unconventional use of wide angles, contrasts in composition, and unusual framing, which came to define the still-nascent genre of street photography.

He was also an acclaimed filmmaker, producing several documentaries and feature films throughout his career, tackling subjects such as the fashion industry, the war in Vietnam and the famous boxer Muhammad Ali.

Marsha Hunt, 104, one of the last surviving actors of Hollywood’s so-called Golden Age of the 1930s and 1940s, who worked with artists ranging from Laurence Olivier to Andy Griffith in a career disrupted for some time by the list black woman from the McCarthy era, died on September 7. in Los Angeles. She arrived in Hollywood in 1935 and over the next 15 years starred in dozens of films, including the adaptation of Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice” starring Olivier and Greer Garson. In her later years, she became an activist, highlighting the plight of refugees and the homeless.

Rommy Hunt Revson, 78, the inventor of the scunci, better known as the Scrunchie, the ubiquitous and inexpensive hair accessory of the late 1980s and 90s that was worn by millions of women, including stars like Madonna , Janet Jackson, Demi Moore, Sarah Jessica Parker and the Olsen twins from the sitcom “Full House,” died Sept. 7 in a hotel room near the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, where she was being treated for Cushing’s disease and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. The cause was a rupture of the ascending aorta. She lived in Wellington, Florida, near West Palm Beach.

Art Rosenbaum, 83, an acclaimed painter and folk musician for half a century of field recordings of American vernacular music, including Appalachian fiddle tunes and ritual music brought from Africa by slaves, died September 4 in a hospital in Athens, Georgia, his adopted hometown. The cause was complications from cancer.

In 2007, Atlanta-based label Dust-to-Digital released the first of two compilation boxes from Rosenbaum’s treasure trove, “Art of Field Recording Volume I: Fifty Years of Traditional American Music Documented by Art Rosenbaum”, which won a Grammy Award for Best Historical Album. Pop music website Pitchfork called the release “revealing” and “an indispensable counterpoint to Harry Smith’s ‘Anthology of American Folk Music,'” a reference to the 1952 compilation of songs that remains a canonical touchstone for folk musicians.

Gwendolyn Midlo Hall, 93, which after years of excavations in obscure libraries in Louisiana, Spain and France succeeded in rescuing the identity of more than 100,000 slaves from archival oblivion and demonstrating the vast extent of African influence on American Cultural Heritage, died August 29 in Guanajuato, Mexico, about 200 miles northwest of Mexico City. Her son Haywood Hall said his death, at his home, came after a recurrence of breast cancer and a stroke. Hall led a colorful youth as a civil rights activist and spent most of her college career at Rutgers University, where she taught Latin American history.

William “Bill” Dygert, 71, a longtime land use consultant active in conservation efforts in southwest Washington, died Aug. 27 at his home in Astoria, Ore., of a lung disease chronic. Dygert was a founding member and longtime board member of the Vancouver, Wash.-based Columbia Land Trust, which has conserved over 55,000 acres in Oregon and Washington State.

Dygert, who grew up in Vancouver, started working for the Clark County Parks Department in 1973, first as an employee and then as an independent contractor. He negotiated with private landowners and obtained funds to enable the conversion of their private properties for public purposes. Through his grant writing, Dygert has secured millions of dollars for municipalities and nonprofits in southwest Washington, according to an obituary in The Columbian.

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Bella Heathcote and Asif Ali ready for survival drama “Roof” – Deadline https://semiospectacle.com/bella-heathcote-and-asif-ali-ready-for-survival-drama-roof-deadline/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 20:32:00 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/bella-heathcote-and-asif-ali-ready-for-survival-drama-roof-deadline/ EXCLUSIVE: Bella Heathcote (Pieces of her) and Asif Ali (don’t worry darling) will direct the survival drama Roofmarking the directorial debut of Salvatore Sciortino, which wrapped production in Los Angeles. The films tell the story of two co-workers who accidentally lock themselves on the roof of a skyscraper during the hottest holiday weekend in years. […]]]>

EXCLUSIVE: Bella Heathcote (Pieces of her) and Asif Ali (don’t worry darling) will direct the survival drama Roofmarking the directorial debut of Salvatore Sciortino, which wrapped production in Los Angeles.

The films tell the story of two co-workers who accidentally lock themselves on the roof of a skyscraper during the hottest holiday weekend in years. Lacking water and unable to communicate with the outside world, they attempt to escape by increasingly dangerous means as their health rapidly deteriorates from the heat. At the same time, an unexpected friendship blossoms as they realize how much they have destroyed each other’s lives.

Josh Tate wrote the screenplay and produced alongside recent Sundance Producing Lab Fellow Austin Sepulveda. The film was supported by a grant from Curt Willis and the Knoxville Film Office, with some filming taking place in Knoxville.

“I feel incredibly lucky to have actors as talented as Bella and Asif in my first film,” Sciortino said. “Their extraordinary chemistry elevates our film to a truly unique place full of humor, empathy and terrifying action.”

Heathcote is an Australian actress who recently starred opposite Toni Collette in the Netflix series Pieces of her by designer Charlotte Stoudt. Before that, she starred with Emily Mortimer in the horror feature film, Relic. The film, which premiered at Sundance in 2020, earned the actress a Best Supporting Actress nomination at the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards. Heathcote has also been seen in films including Professor Marston and the Wonder Women, fifty shades darker, The neon demon, Does not weaken, dark shadows and On timeand on series like The Man in the High Castle.

Ali is an actor and comedian who found a breakout role on Disney+ Wanda Vision and recently appeared in Universal Pictures’ Easter Sunday alongside Jo Koy. The actor will next be seen in the Warner Bros. by Olivia Wilde don’t worry darling, which premiered at the Venice Film Festival and is scheduled for release on September 23. Other notable credits for Ali include Disney+ The Mandalorianby Netflix BoJack Rider and Roshan Sethi’s Independent Spirit Award winner, 7 days.

Heathcote is represented by WME, More/Medavoy Management, Australian agency JM and Sloane, Offer, Weber & Dern; Ali by Mohammed Ali at Authentic Talent and Literary Management, CAA and Goodman, Genow, Schenkman.

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Lena Dunham’s Medieval Coming-of-Ager – The Hollywood Reporter https://semiospectacle.com/lena-dunhams-medieval-coming-of-ager-the-hollywood-reporter/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 19:31:40 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/lena-dunhams-medieval-coming-of-ager-the-hollywood-reporter/ In her second directorial effort this year, Lena Dunham forgoes the adult themes of pointed stick to tell a more traditional coming-of-age story about a headstrong teenager living in medieval times. A significant departure from most of his previous work, the broad and playful Catherine called Birdypremiering at the Toronto Film Festival, is a heartfelt […]]]>

In her second directorial effort this year, Lena Dunham forgoes the adult themes of pointed stick to tell a more traditional coming-of-age story about a headstrong teenager living in medieval times. A significant departure from most of his previous work, the broad and playful Catherine called Birdypremiering at the Toronto Film Festival, is a heartfelt effort at the genre of classic young adult films that populated the ’90s and early 2000s. Young adult storytelling has always been about more than love triangles. and devastating wars, but in a post-hunger games world, it is easy to forget the small, more personal stories. Fortunately, Dunham has no trouble remembering the 1994 novel by Karen Cushman that this film is based on, capturing the book’s humorous diary format with cheeky voice-over narration.

In the early 1200s, Lady Catherine (Bella Ramsey) is a girl on the cusp of womanhood. This is great news for his father Lord Rollo (Flea bag‘s Andrew Scott), who is eager to marry off his daughter to secure the family finances. Although they are well-off people, Rollo is deeply in debt, which he blames on his wife Lady Aislinn (Billie Piper) for her expensive tastes. But Catherine, nicknamed Birdy, has no interest in getting married, choosing instead to spend her days clinging to childhood with her peasant friend Perkin (Michael Woolfitt) and servant Meg (Rita Bernard-Shaw).

Catherine called Birdy

The essential

Naughty and charming.

Venue: Toronto International Film Festival (special presentations)
Cast: Bella Ramsey, Andrew Scott, Billie Piper, Joe Alwyn, Isis Hainsworth, Sophie Okonedo
Director: Lena Dunham

1 hour 48 minutes

She keeps a diary, writing to her brother Edward, who lives away from the family as a monk. There’s also her Uncle George (Joe Alwyn), who she has a childhood crush on. It’s a lively cast, each playing their role with lightness and humor. The film almost feels like the pilot of a series, with Dunham portraying Medieval Times as a high-level playground.

Each character is introduced with on-screen text, sharing their story and personal qualities. This reinforces the comedic tone of the film, encouraging viewers to see the world through Birdy’s observant but immature eyes. Similar to Heath Ledger 2001 vehicle tone The story of a knight, Catherine called Birdy balances anachronistic narrative tendencies with authentic observations on the social issues of the time.

Ramsey plays Birdy in the style of classic literary heroines like Pippi Longstocking and Anne of Green Gables, all heart and energy with the courage to speak her mind. And with Perkin, the two form a pair reminiscent of French orphan Madeline and her friend Pepito. The film opens with her playing in the mud with her friends, reveling in the unbridled mess that is childhood. Why would she want to leave that for arranged marriages, dowries and household responsibilities?

But when Birdy starts getting her period, she knows playtime is coming to an end. And when her dad starts setting her up dates with potential husbands, Birdy does everything she can to chase them away. In true Princess Kaguya fashion, Birdy approaches suitors with an immediate dismissal. Each man is older than her, ranging from youngest to oldest. Each is met with old-fashioned pranks, lies, and bad behavior, sending Birdy’s father into a mad rage when his efforts succeed.

Scott is the highlight of the movie, playing a truly unlikable patriarch with the manic energy that made his Moriah on sherlock so convincing. He’s the perfect match for Ramsey, whose sincere face and voice mask a much smarter girl than she lets on. Alwyn is also in great shape, with her charming eyes and princely manner. But as with most of his work, the real star of the show is Dunham, whose sharp dialogue and direction endows each actor with an acid tongue and a knowing gaze.

Catherine called Birdy is the kind of small, mid-budget teen movie that rarely gets made. Dunham’s direction is airy and calm, divorced from the wistful tone and devastating brutality we’ve come to associate with stories set in this era. Despite the inherent darkness of a girl being pushed to grow up faster than she would like, Dunham finds humor in the absurdity of gender roles. Although the realities of the time mean that Birdy will eventually have to become a young bride, for a while the film allows her to be a child for a bit longer.

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On Kalki Krishnamurthy’s 123rd Birthday, Ponniyin Selvan Producers Pay Tribute https://semiospectacle.com/on-kalki-krishnamurthys-123rd-birthday-ponniyin-selvan-producers-pay-tribute/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 08:52:51 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/on-kalki-krishnamurthys-123rd-birthday-ponniyin-selvan-producers-pay-tribute/ Mani Ratnam’s epic period drama Ponniyin Selvan: Part One is set to hit theaters on September 30 and fans can’t keep calm. And today is the 123rd birthday of Kalki Krishnamurthy, the author of this book. On this occasion, the official Madras Talkies account tweeted a video about him. While sharing the video, the team […]]]>

Mani Ratnam’s epic period drama Ponniyin Selvan: Part One is set to hit theaters on September 30 and fans can’t keep calm. And today is the 123rd birthday of Kalki Krishnamurthy, the author of this book.

On this occasion, the official Madras Talkies account tweeted a video about him. While sharing the video, the team wrote, “Writer. Visionary. Literary game changer! It’s Kalki’s 123rd birthday and we thank him for Ponniyin Selvan and the characters who stayed with us!

The video received over 14,000 views within hours. Netizens are loving this video and it can be seen in the comment section.

One of the users commented, “We should keep the trailer and audio launch on his birthday. Thank you mister Kalki for an evergreen novel. Thank you to the legends who made this cinema.

Another also wrote: “A little gripe about the guys in the movie. Why do they all look like “hulks” and are they too aggressive? The characters portrayed by Maniyam had the athletic physique of a warrior, the beauty and kindness that shone through!

Another said: “Its gender portrayal is indeed visionary and refreshing to see even now. Such beautiful, evocative writing that can be appreciated even through translations.

Another user wrote: “Thank you Madras Talkies for giving us the chance to see his writings on the big screen! Our decades of IMAGINATION have finally taken shape.

The cast of Ponniyin Selvan: Part One includes Vikram, Aishwarya Rai Bachchan, Jayam Ravi, Karthi, Trisha, Aishwarya Lekshmi, Sobhita Dhulipala, Prabhu, R. Sarathkumar, Vikram Prabhu, Jayaram, Prakash Raj, Rahman and R. Partiban among others. .

The Chola dynasty is at the center of the film, which is set in the 10th century. It revolves around the drama, threats and crisis of the Chola Empire in southern India. The film will also highlight the main wars, conflicts and opponents of the mighty empire.

This film by Mani Ratnam is an adaptation of the novel of the same name by Kalki Krishnamurthy in 1955. The film will be distributed in two parts across India.

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