Literary arts – Semiospectacle http://semiospectacle.com/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 16:53:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://semiospectacle.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Literary arts – Semiospectacle http://semiospectacle.com/ 32 32 Writers Who Teach: Literary Arts Teachers Share Their Experiences https://semiospectacle.com/writers-who-teach-literary-arts-teachers-share-their-experiences/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 19:00:01 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/writers-who-teach-literary-arts-teachers-share-their-experiences/ The growing popularity of creative writing degree over the past 50 years has been accompanied by growing criticism of the institutionalization of writing. This discourse often returned to the same question: can writing be taught? Although there has never been and probably never will be a conclusive answer to this question, the practice of teaching […]]]>

The growing popularity of creative writing degree over the past 50 years has been accompanied by growing criticism of the institutionalization of writing. This discourse often returned to the same question: can writing be taught?

Although there has never been and probably never will be a conclusive answer to this question, the practice of teaching writing has continued despite the debate. But very often it is those who write who teach. The Department of Literary Arts at Brown has had a faculty of nationally and internationally renowned authors since its inception in the 1960s by poet, translator, critic, and professor emeritus of English and comparative literature Edwin Honig.

You can teach writing, said associate professor of literary arts Karan Mahajan, even if you can’t make someone talented who isn’t.

Author of “Family Planning” and “The association of little bombs», finalist of the National Book Awards 2016, Mahajan tries to locate the strong points of the writer and to encourage them in this direction. “I think you can teach students to access the most interesting parts of themselves and show them that they carry the seeds of interesting stories within them,” he said.

Literary arts professor Thalia Field ’88 MFA ’95 believes “very strongly that creative writing can be taught” but pedagogically disagrees with the standard “workshop model”, a she declared. Field is the author of several innovative and experimental books, the most recent of which is “Personhood”, published in 2021.

The workshop format “confuses teaching with editing,” she said, “and it ignores (the) creative process, which for me is central to learning how to be. a sustainably productive and healthy artist in the world”.

“I see a lot of paralysis and a lot of young artists stuck in their practice because the creative process isn’t central to the pedagogy in most creative writing workshops,” Field said. She thinks most people need coaching and support until they start learning their own creative process.

Field also teaches in a highly interdisciplinary way so that writers in his courses can engage in multiple forms. Her teaching style reflects her writing practice and experimental work, she explained.

“I’ve always worked at the intersection of creative non-fiction and more imaginative writing,” she said. “I find a very important place where both can create opportunities to reflect on issues that are otherwise difficult to resolve.”

The experimental nature of his work was one of the many reasons Field decided to teach in addition to writing. “I didn’t want to strain my books for having to make money that way,” she said. But she was also always interested in “the dynamics of pedagogy” and began teaching in different formats shortly after college.

Literary arts professor Eleni Sikelianos is the author of two hybrid memoirs and several poems, collections, and collections, including a book-length poem, “What I Knew,” published in 2019. Her own research as an artist have influenced what she teaches, she says.

“For me, poetry in particular is an impulse towards freedom, and that can be freedom of syntax, freedom of the ways in which we expect language to make sense – it can mean all kinds of freedoms”, Sikelianos added. “It’s something I always want to think about when I teach: how can I help my students feel liberated in different ways and how can we have adventures together?”

Mahajan also enjoys talking to students about what “it’s really like to be a writer,” he said, which involves looking at the lives of writers and considering not just how they got into the profession, but also how they maintain it.

For many literary arts teachers, the practice of teaching impacts the craft of writing just as writing influences teaching.

Teaching made Mahajan a better writer by making him a better reader and thinker, he said. As a teacher, he must carefully reread the books he has already read, which helps him to extract new value from them.

“And your students show you new ways to look at these texts,” he added.

Since writing is a solitary practice, he likes the balance between having time for himself and meeting students. “I’m always full of energy when I come out of one of my classes,” he added.

“I learn from my students all the time, as well as from the texts that we read together,” Sikelianos said. Her former students also often became collaborators after she taught them.

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But she also acknowledged that teaching can inhibit her writing in some ways. “You try to put frames on the ways of thinking so you can convey it to others,” Sikelianos said. These frameworks may not be the most fruitful approach to one’s own writing. Time constraints pose an additional challenge, she added.

Field is currently on leave to focus on his own work. “It requires having time when I’m not teaching in order to really do the deeper, more dreamlike, more research-based aspects of the process,” Field said. “There are parts of my creative process that are easier to do while I’m teaching and parts that are truly impossible.”

Still, Field finds the teaching very inspiring. “I love working with students and young artists, so it doesn’t hurt me,” she says.

The professors also had tips for budding writers and literary arts students.

“I think people who become writers are people who keep doing it, who are willing to take risks with their writing, who are willing to tell the truth about things that are hard to talk about otherwise,” said Mahajan.

But he stressed that writing isn’t for everyone – it’s a difficult and lonely profession that could make some people unhappy in the long run. “I think there’s a kind of romance associated with writing that I think it’s our job as teachers to dispel and expose students to the challenges you face in a career as a writer. “, did he declare.

Field emphasized the importance of deepening a writer’s relationship with their own work so that it remains “authentic, genuine, radical, and unique.” “The relationship with your work is a primal, evolving, dynamic relationship, and it’s not always easy and it’s not always linear,” she said.

Sikelianos, on the other hand, spoke about the importance of finding a community of other writers. “It doesn’t have to be a living community,” she says. “It may be a community of poets and writers who died centuries ago. But it’s finding those things that inspire you.

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Arts & Cultural Council of Bucks hosts member fairs and literary arts events https://semiospectacle.com/arts-cultural-council-of-bucks-hosts-member-fairs-and-literary-arts-events/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 04:01:00 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/arts-cultural-council-of-bucks-hosts-member-fairs-and-literary-arts-events/ Join the Bucks County Arts and Culture Council from noon to 4 p.m. on October 1 and 2 for the closing of the Fall Lounge Members’ Lounge at Freeman Hall on East Court Street in Doylestown. Stop by to view the exhibition featuring the work of over 125 regional artists, including 250 paintings, drawings, prints, […]]]>

Join the Bucks County Arts and Culture Council from noon to 4 p.m. on October 1 and 2 for the closing of the Fall Lounge Members’ Lounge at Freeman Hall on East Court Street in Doylestown.

Stop by to view the exhibition featuring the work of over 125 regional artists, including 250 paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, mixed media works, sculptures, handmade books, ceramics, jewelry, and more. Visitors to the fair continue to comment on the variety of works on display, the breadth of local talent on display, and the historic setting that invites guests to linger and appreciate the work.

The Fall Salon Show is also an opportunity for collectors, all of whom are welcome to view the show and support local artists by making a purchase. Framed and matted works are available for sale.

Additionally, from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday, October 2, the Council for Arts and Culture will host local authors signing and selling their books, as well as book illustrators showcasing their work. Book genres include fiction, non-fiction, travel memoirs, children’s books, and poetry.






Join and connect with these A&C literary and visual artists: Joe Chelius, Julie Fratrik, Jane Mohler, Margaret Montet, Bernadette McBride, Steve Nolan, David Roth, Bill Wunder, Patricia Goodrich, Julie Standig, Bill Hemmig, Marie Kane and Deborah Hoeffner. Robbin Farr, A&C Literary Arts Committee Member, said: “It’s a great opportunity to meet local authors and talk to them about their work, their inspiration and their style.

Freeman Hall is located at 181 E. Court St. in Doylestown. Free parking is available, and the exhibition and programs are free and open to the public.

For more details on the Bucks County Council for Arts and Culture, to view member galleries, learn more about membership and sponsorship, and to view a calendar of events, visit bucksarts.org.

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Whistler Writers Fest Celebrates Literary Arts in Fall Colors — Stir https://semiospectacle.com/whistler-writers-fest-celebrates-literary-arts-in-fall-colors-stir/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 19:10:14 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/whistler-writers-fest-celebrates-literary-arts-in-fall-colors-stir/ Much like a book club, the festival launch events are sure to spark conversation and camaraderie. Highlights of October 13 include the opening night at the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Center featuring Canada’s top independent writers. A brand new event follows; Sharing Traditions: An Evening of Oral Storytelling features Tsawaysia Spukwus (Squamish Nation), Tanina Williams (Lil’wat […]]]>

Much like a book club, the festival launch events are sure to spark conversation and camaraderie. Highlights of October 13 include the opening night at the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Center featuring Canada’s top independent writers. A brand new event follows; Sharing Traditions: An Evening of Oral Storytelling features Tsawaysia Spukwus (Squamish Nation), Tanina Williams (Lil’wat Nation) and eight local storytellers. Don’t miss this opportunity to learn and experience the beautiful tradition of oral storytelling, historically practiced in winter when people had more time to relax and share stories.

The beloved Book Lover’s Literary Fair on October 14 brings that same community feeling to the mountainside festival. Journalist and author Marsha Lederman will provide a thoughtful conversation about her recently published memoir, Embrace the Red Stairs: The Holocaust, Once Suppressedwith festival founder Stella Harvey.

On October 14, it’s time to raise a glass at the Cabaret Littéraire: We’re Back, Live Baby!. Hosted this year by local scribe and musician Stephen Vogler, this favorite festival features readings from some of Canada’s most beloved and emerging authors, including Amber Cowie, Joseph Dandurand, Norma Dunning, Gary Geddes, Tamar Glouberman, Hasan Namir, Mari -Lou Rowley, and Shyam Selvadurai, all accompanied by live music from the West Coast Front Band. Winners of the Whistler Independent Book Awards will also be announced just before the literary cabaret begins.

Sharing Stories Together: A festival celebration and fundraiser come together over light bites, wine and live music on October 15. That same day, the festival’s flagship gala, on Saturday evening, offers an unmissable conversation between the authors Méira Cook (The complete disaster) and Iain Reid (we spread). These brilliant minds will talk about everything from community and relationships to identity and art, giving attendees something to sleep over.

For a relaxing start to the day, there’s The Sunday Book Talk: Coffee and Conversation on October 16. With fresh breakfast pastries, coffee or tea, and fascinating insight into what makes great authors tick, it’s a leisurely way for guests to reawaken their bodies and minds. Moderated by Wayne Grady, the all-new session features Cody Caetano (Half-Bads in White Regalia), Lisa Moore (That’s how we love), Heather O’Neill (When we lost our minds), and Jamal Said (My way to Damascus).

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Megacity Review™ (MCR), a literary arts journal for underrepresented voices, is launching its first writing contest. https://semiospectacle.com/megacity-review-mcr-a-literary-arts-journal-for-underrepresented-voices-is-launching-its-first-writing-contest/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 15:57:00 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/megacity-review-mcr-a-literary-arts-journal-for-underrepresented-voices-is-launching-its-first-writing-contest/ With the advent of Hispanic Heritage Month, Megacity Review™ is offering up to $1,000 for fiction and nonfiction stories for authors of color and their allies. LOS ANGELES, California, USA, September 16, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Megacity Review™, a literary arts journal for underrepresented voices, has launched its first writing competition in fiction and non-fiction. Since […]]]>

With the advent of Hispanic Heritage Month, Megacity Review™ is offering up to $1,000 for fiction and nonfiction stories for authors of color and their allies.

LOS ANGELES, California, USA, September 16, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Megacity Review™, a literary arts journal for underrepresented voices, has launched its first writing competition in fiction and non-fiction. Since the populations of urban centers are made up of people from all over the world, MCR bets on their interactions to create captivating stories. “Living in big cities, called megacities, you interact with people from all over the world, from all kinds of backgrounds,” said MCR editor Genaro Trejo. “Their relationships tell compelling stories, but talented writers are often overwhelmed by the publishing process.” Mr. Trejo, who has helped fund films such as “The Invention of Lying” with Rick Gervais and “The Tao of Steve” with Sandra Bullock, supports new and emerging voices. “In these times of uncertainty, representation is an important component that is often overlooked in publishing. We are here to help fix the problem,” Trejo said.

A registered nonprofit, MCR works to help writers of color, women, and their allies build and expand their literary communities. The competition will initially be screened by MCR’s editorial staff, led by MCR’s Managing Editor, Lisa McKamy (University of Chicago Press). The winners will be chosen by Robinne Lee (www.robinlee.com), actor and author of “The Idea of ​​You”, and Richard Villegas, Jr., whose work inspired the Starz series, “Vida”. Submissions will be taken until November 30 and the non-fungible token (NFT) is expected in January 2023. View www.megacityreview.org/submissions for more details.

About Megacity Review™
MCR publishes and shines a light on underrepresented voices, including Latino, African American, Asian, and Pacific Islander authors and their allies. Founded by social entrepreneur and East Los Angeles native Genaro Trejo, MCR is an affiliate of Stem the Slide, a registered 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. MCR is published bi-annually by NFT. For media inquiries, please contact submits@megacityreview.org

Ryan Hilterbran
Megacity Review
write to us here

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Celebrate the literary arts https://semiospectacle.com/celebrate-the-literary-arts/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 17:03:45 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/celebrate-the-literary-arts/ September 6 – The Cullman County Library and Friends of Cullman County Public Libraries continue to provide access to literature to Cullman County residents after its brand new small free library is installed in the Art Park from the city. The non-profit organization Little Free Library aims to remove all barriers to book access through […]]]>

September 6 – The Cullman County Library and Friends of Cullman County Public Libraries continue to provide access to literature to Cullman County residents after its brand new small free library is installed in the Art Park from the city.

The non-profit organization Little Free Library aims to remove all barriers to book access through its global network of 24-hour “sharing boxes”.

Art Park’s newest site marks the library’s second site installed in the city of Cullman, and their sixth countywide installation, with a seventh to be installed in Dodge City in the coming weeks.

FPLCC board member Renee Walsh said that while the intended purpose of the sharing boxes is to provide access to books, that after the installation of their box – located on Rosemont Avenue – it became apparent that sites can be quickly adapted by the community for many other Resources.

“The first one we installed on Rosemont, about two years ago this month. It was in the middle of the pandemic, and people were putting food there. It was so significant that people recognized this need because it was widely used. was our first – it was a little bigger than this – and we were loading it up with books, and one day there was canned food, beans and rice,” Walsh said.

Keeping that in mind, Walsh and Cullman County Library Manager Sharon Townson said the idea was to supply the Art Park box with children’s books, but they were open and hopeful about the possibility of a future installation of a second small free library in the park designed for the community to contribute and share their works.

Cullman Parks, Recreation and Sports Tourism Director Nathan Anderson said that — particularly with the outside of the box adorned with visual contributions from Cullman Arts Council member Emily Bussman — the installation was consistent with the concept of the park. Although not much more than a sapling, Anderson and Townson imagine that future generations will enjoy the books in the small free library under the park’s “reading tree.”

“Right now it’s just for news,” Townson said.

“This park was designed to celebrate the arts, and the literary arts is something we celebrate now with this little free library,” Anderson said.

Patrick Camp can be reached at 256-734-2131 ext. 238

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Celebrating the Literary Arts | New https://semiospectacle.com/celebrating-the-literary-arts-new/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 16:59:00 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/celebrating-the-literary-arts-new/ The Cullman County Library and Friends of Cullman County Public Libraries continue to provide access to literature for Cullman County residents following the installation of its brand new small free library in the city’s Art Park . The non-profit organization Little Free Library aims to remove all barriers to book access through its global network […]]]>

The Cullman County Library and Friends of Cullman County Public Libraries continue to provide access to literature for Cullman County residents following the installation of its brand new small free library in the city’s Art Park .

The non-profit organization Little Free Library aims to remove all barriers to book access through its global network of 24-hour “sharing boxes”.

Art Park’s newest site marks the library’s second site installed in the city of Cullman, and their sixth countywide installation, with a seventh to be installed in Dodge City in the coming weeks.

FPLCC board member Renee Walsh said that while the intended purpose of the sharing boxes is to provide access to books, that after the installation of their box – located on Rosemont Avenue – it became clear that sites can be quickly adapted by the community for many other Resources.

“The first one we installed on Rosemont, about two years ago this month. It was just during the pandemic, and people were putting food there. It was so significant that people recognized this need because it was widely used. It was our first – it was a little bigger than this – and we were loading it up with books, and one day there was canned food, beans and rice,” Walsh said.

Keeping that in mind, Walsh and Cullman County Library Manager Sharon Townson said the idea was to supply the Art Park box with children’s books, but they were open and hopeful about the possibility of a future installation of a second small free library in the park designed for the community to contribute and share their works.

Cullman Parks, Recreation and Sports Tourism Director Nathan Anderson said that — particularly with the outside of the box adorned with visual contributions from Cullman Arts Council member Emily Bussman — the installation was consistent with the concept of the park. Although not much more than a sapling, Anderson and Townson envision future generations enjoying the books in the small free library under the park’s “reading tree.”

“Right now it’s just for news,” Townson said.

“This park was designed to celebrate the arts, and the literary arts is something we celebrate now with this little free library,” Anderson said.

Patrick Camp can be reached at 256-734-2131 ext. 238

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Julie Mancini, language lover and literary arts champion, dies at 73 https://semiospectacle.com/julie-mancini-language-lover-and-literary-arts-champion-dies-at-73/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 20:35:09 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/julie-mancini-language-lover-and-literary-arts-champion-dies-at-73/ Julie Mancini, former executive director of literary arts, was a “force for good in every way,” according to former Portland City Commissioner Mike Lindberg. Photo courtesy: Literary Arts Julie Mancini, longtime leader of what is now literary arts and fighter revealing the existence and visibility of the Portland literary scene, died Monday at the age […]]]>
Julie Mancini, former executive director of literary arts, was a “force for good in every way,” according to former Portland City Commissioner Mike Lindberg. Photo courtesy: Literary Arts

Julie Mancini, longtime leader of what is now literary arts and fighter revealing the existence and visibility of the Portland literary scene, died Monday at the age of 73 surrounded by her immediate family. The cause of death was not immediately available.

Mancini joined what was then known as Portland Arts & Lectures in 1985. The organization merged in 1993 with the Oregon Institute of Literary Arts to become Literary Arts, and Mancini served as executive director for 15 years.. In 1997 she founded Writers in the Schools, now Literary Arts Youth Programs. When she left Literary Arts, the organization had a budget of $750,000 and an endowment of $1 million.

“Julie was a force of nature”, Director General of Literary Arts andrew overseer wrote on the band’s website on Wednesday. “She was smart and wry and funny and caring and pretty much unstoppable. She was radically creative. I feel incredibly lucky to have known her and feel the strength of her professional accomplishments every day as I continue her work.

Mancini earned her master’s degree in child development from Tufts University and put it to use as a preschool teacher in South Boston and later as a child development educator at Portland Community College. . In addition to working with Literary Arts, Mancini has served on the board of the Children’s Institute. After leaving the literary arts, she was the first general manager of caldera arts, then founded the Lyceum agency, representing writers for their public appearances. She then became director of Mercy Corps Action Center in Portland before serving as executive director of Possible Oregon University in 2015.

From growing weekly local audiences into the thousands to winning over internationally acclaimed authors – including Maya Angelou, Philip Roth, Salman Rushdieand Joan Didion and her husband, John Dunne – to visit Portland, Mancini was known as a passionate advocate of books, writers, and the fine art of language.

In a 1989 Oregon article of Mancini’s selection as head of Mercy Corps’ Old Town Action Center, Nancy Bragdon, who worked with her in the literary arts, said of Mancini, “Julie sees possibilities…she is absolutely superb to start things off.”

Megan McMorran, who worked in the literary arts alongside Mancini from 1987 to 2000, said she was exceptionally beloved. She was constantly looking for new ways to support both writers and readers, and her impact on the community extended beyond facilitating visits from renowned authors to ensuring unique programming for school-aged children. and pay decent salaries to local writers.

Portland author Karen Karbo recalled in a Facebook post: “In 1997 she called me and asked if I wanted to be paid ‘real money’ to teach a 3-week crash course in creative writing at a local high school. I parachuted in and commandeered the class, while the regular class teacher sat down (in one instance, a teacher excused himself while I learned to pick up his dry cleaner). For a good three thousand, I would have three weeks to do whatever I wanted. I loved the crazy creative/guerrilla spirit of this whole company. It was pure Julie. It was the start of writers at school.”

Mancini was “one of the most important figures in Oregon’s history in terms of arts and culture,” former city commissioner Mike Lindberg wrote in a Facebook post this week. “She was a force for good in every way. I miss the conversations that always led me to believe anything was possible.

As well as being a talented and driven administrator, Mancini was also a gifted speaker – although she still wrote her name on cue cards due to bouts of event-related anxiety, it said. she joked once. In a speech during Celebrating 30 years of Literary Arts in 2014, she captivated her audience with anecdotes from her long career and demonstrated how her willpower and unyielding drive had yielded positive results.

“What we did for the first few years was literally beg writers to come here,” she said. “It’s hard to remember a time when writers and editors didn’t care about Portland, Oregon… We finally brought in Joan Didion and her husband, John Gregory Dunne, because Calvin Trillin called them and told them, ‘OK, go ahead, I promise you. Stay at the Heathman and eat the salmon hash. So they did.

“Salman Rushdie came during the fatwa and we needed everyone to call the office and give us his name, then we had to check the identities of 3,000 people at the door,” she continued. “Other people came because they saw the list of people who had already come. When we asked Toni Morisson why she finally, finally came, she said, ‘Because you kept asking.'”

Of all of Mancini’s accomplishments, perhaps her greatest is the positivity she has embedded in those around her. Colleagues, friends, family, authors and acquaintances all had a happy word or story to share. Barry Johnson, editor of Oregon ArtsWatch, called her “a dynamo, creator of legendary and sometimes R-rated riffs, wonderful gossip, brilliant and sensitive reader of her audience’s psychology, excellent people-connector and almost irresistible persuasion. “She was dazzling in a town that didn’t have a lot of dazzlings. She handed out candy and goodies to miscellaneous, and miscellaneous! She loved people as a whole… no one in Portland was even remotely like her.”

In his Facebook post, Karbo writes: “This first year [of Writers in the Schools] the kids and I came up with the idea from Xerox and binding an anthology of their essays and short stories… They wanted to call it The Big Book of Naked Women Photos. (There were no photos in the anthology, nude or otherwise.) I thought, sure, why not? These kids are seniors in high school. Julie said I could do whatever I wanted. And she didn’t betray the spirit of the company. I brought it to her and she gave that big smile we all loved. ‘It’s fucking fantastic!’ Of course, it was Julie who was fucking fantastic. There are so many amazing writers, teachers, students, administrators, volunteers, and readers that make Portland the shining literary star that it is, but there was no one like Julie. Perhaps she is already setting up a series of readings in the Summerlands. Farewell, my dear.

Sponsor

Portland Columbia Symphony Orchestra Portland Oregon
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Review: ‘Escape Into Meaning’ a masterful survey of literary arts, film and more | book reviews https://semiospectacle.com/review-escape-into-meaning-a-masterful-survey-of-literary-arts-film-and-more-book-reviews/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/review-escape-into-meaning-a-masterful-survey-of-literary-arts-film-and-more-book-reviews/ ESCAPE IN THE SENSE. By Evan Puschak. Earphone books. 272 pages. $27. Going broad and deep, journalist Evan Puschak reflects on a remarkable range of artistic, political, and philosophical territory in his first article, aptly titled “Escape Into Meaning.” And it does so incisively, offering unexpected connections and unusually insightful observations on subjects that are […]]]>

ESCAPE IN THE SENSE. By Evan Puschak. Earphone books. 272 pages. $27.

Going broad and deep, journalist Evan Puschak reflects on a remarkable range of artistic, political, and philosophical territory in his first article, aptly titled “Escape Into Meaning.”

And it does so incisively, offering unexpected connections and unusually insightful observations on subjects that are both noble and deceptively mundane.

Puschak, a former MSNBC media editor and host of the Discovery Channel’s “Seeker Daily,” is now best known for his YouTube channel “The NerdWriter,” a weekly video essay series “that puts ideas to work.”

Here, these ideas burst and crackle.

Whether dissecting how American education often works against its own design, assessing the dynamics of group friendships and shared identities, or finding rich thematic confluences in the arts , the 33-year-old American residing in Spain is a generally incisive culture. critic who wears his enthusiasms on his sleeve – in an entertaining way. He also has serious points to make.

Who else would lend (legitimate) intellectual weight to Jerry Seinfeld’s stand-up comedy, or parse the philosophical and cinematic virtues of “Blade Runner” and “Lord of the Rings” without bringing up a fan’s whimsical musings? boy?

If it occasionally betrays a tendency to spring, picking a bone with such minor digressions would be like worrying about a stunted metatarsal.

His excellent essay on Ralph Waldo Emerson is the springboard for appreciating the power of articulation: “Someone formulates something perfectly and an idea that was a fog in the background of your mind suddenly solidifies” and comes to life. , a matter of “taking the most vague, the most universal reflections and refining them to perfection.”

For Puschak, the literary arts are full of wizards of such articulation.

“Everyone has their tricks, their material, but all have the same goal: to say something true, to find a thought so passionate and so alive that… it has its own architecture, and adorns nature with a new thing.”

In “Thinking in Works”, Puschak questions whether an artist’s work can itself be a work of art. Discussing the poet William Butler Yates, he concludes that it is possible: “Yeats proves it without a doubt, I think. While each poem has a completeness of its own, the overall unity is its ultimate expression.

But the former film student, excused from an excessive attachment to the work of Quentin Tarantino, is also in love with cinema. Of particular fascination is how the Cyberpunk novels of the 1980s, notably William Gibson’s “Neuromancer,” introduced a radically new aesthetic to movies.

“Extraordinary films transport you to their worlds, but with Ridley Scott’s ‘Blade Runner’ (1982), it was the opposite: the film world transported me.”

On more earthly matters, Puschak addresses the dilemma of decision-making when esteemed experts express honest disagreement, the need to regularly reassess one’s beliefs, and our growing ideological divide:

“Decades pass without meaningful updates to policies designed for a world long gone. The status quo is becoming more entrenched and the issue is bogged down in the mud of partisanship. After a while, staying the course can become riskier than trying something different.

He lifts the heavy stuff with a celebration of “the historical reconstruction of the metropolis” seen from an urban park bench – what Balzac called “the gastronomy of the eye” – an essay that evolves into a thought experiment on the town planning on a human scale.

Puschak sometimes reads like a young Oliver Sacks – no small compliment – ​​and his musings can be just as elegant and masterful. He probes, questions and digests with a skill so assured that it belies his own insecurities and uncertain opinions. It is a voice to be attended to.

Get a weekly list of tips on pop-ups, last-minute tickets, and little-known experiences curated by our newsroom delivered to your inbox every Thursday.

Critical Bill Thompson is a Charleston-based writer.

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Bookmarked Festival of Literary Arts: Introducing award-winning novelist Percival Everett https://semiospectacle.com/bookmarked-festival-of-literary-arts-introducing-award-winning-novelist-percival-everett/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 22:07:30 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/bookmarked-festival-of-literary-arts-introducing-award-winning-novelist-percival-everett/ The Bookmarked Festival of Literary Arts is thrilled to announce this year’s keynote speaker: author, Percival Everett! Percival Everett is the author of over thirty novels and collections of stories, including The Trees, Telephone, So Much Blue, Virgil Russell’s Percival Everett, I Am Not Sidney Poitier and Erasure. Everett has won the National Book Critics […]]]>

The Bookmarked Festival of Literary Arts is thrilled to announce this year’s keynote speaker: author, Percival Everett!

Percival Everett is the author of over thirty novels and collections of stories, including The Trees, Telephone, So Much Blue, Virgil Russell’s Percival Everett, I Am Not Sidney Poitier and Erasure. Everett has won the National Book Critics Circle’s Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award, Dos Passos Prize, PEN Center USA Award for Fiction, PEN Oakland/Josephine Miles Literary Award, Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for Fiction, The 2010 Believer Book Award, the Premio Gregor von Rezzori, a Creative Capital Award, BS the Oscar for Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He is a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship. Everett is currently Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Southern California. He lives in Los Angeles.

Hear Everett talk about the intersectionality of reader and writer on Saturday, September 17e at 4:30 p.m.-6 p.m.

After the presentation, Bookmarked and the Lander Library Friends Association host a dinner with Percival Everett at Cowfish Restaurant in Lander.

Tickets are on sale TODAY and space is limited. Get your ticket now!

$45 by check (Lander Library Friends Association) or cash at the Lander Library will get you a seat at the table.

This event is sponsored in part by the LOR Foundation and the Lander Chamber of Commerce.


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Houston-based Inprint celebrates 40 years in the literary arts https://semiospectacle.com/houston-based-inprint-celebrates-40-years-in-the-literary-arts-3/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 23:57:54 +0000 https://semiospectacle.com/houston-based-inprint-celebrates-40-years-in-the-literary-arts-3/ HOUSTON, August 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Inprint, Houston’s premier literary arts nonprofit, today announced that it has reached its 40th anniversary as a resource for creatives across the city. This milestone reflects the organization’s commitment to the community, serving more than 15,000 readers and writers through literary activities. Inprint is proud of lead a community […]]]>

HOUSTON, August 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Inprint, Houston’s premier literary arts nonprofit, today announced that it has reached its 40th anniversary as a resource for creatives across the city. This milestone reflects the organization’s commitment to the community, serving more than 15,000 readers and writers through literary activities. Inprint is proud of lead a community of creatives with workshops, readings, literary events and other programs that attract authors and patrons from around the world.

Founded in 1983, Inprint was conceived as a resource for readers and writers to help Houston continue to rise to prominence as a city known for its rich literary history. Working directly with the University of Houston’s Ph.D. in Spanish with a concentration in creative writing program, Inprint supports emerging writers in their pursuits by not only providing them with a community in which to thrive, but also scholarships, awards and employment assistance, totaling over $4 million to date.

Run strictly by volunteers until 1991, when funding allowed it to retain a full-time staff, Inprint relied heavily on donations and volunteers within the community. Anonymous donations and a variety of fundraising activities have helped the organization succeed in nurturing an inclusive and deeply involved literary community in the greater Houston area. Inprint’s Writers’ Workshops have been named by Houston Press as the best place for aspiring writers, providing an in-depth and intimate creative experience for attendees looking to hone their skills.

Inprint has flourished over its 40-year history under the leadership of a number of key executives, including former Chairman France Neely and current Board Chair, Marcia West. The torch will be passed to another community leader during the anniversary festivities, with Mary S. Dawson as the new Inprint Board Chair. Each of these three women served more than 15 years in service to the organization.

“In its 40 years of promoting, praising and valuing the diversity of literature, Inprint has become an internationally renowned literary light,” said former president and philanthropist Franci Neely. “Being Chairman of Inprint’s Board of Directors has been my singular honor, working with Rich [Levy, the executive director] and Krupa [Parikh, an associate director] and Marilyn [Jones, an associate director] in the atmosphere of grace, spirit and warmth which they have created. My life is richer for it. Congratulations, Inprint, on 40 years of extraordinary excellence.”

The Board of Directors and Advisory Council work with staff to oversee a wide range of programs in support of the creative endeavors of budding writers. This also includes coordinating and ensuring the success of the Ball of poets and writerswhich brings together philanthropists like Neely alongside creatives to celebrate Inprint’s work in the literary arts.

About Inprint

Inprint is a nationally recognized nonprofit literary arts organization that connects and nurtures readers and writers in Houston. Inprint House is located in the heart of Houston’s Museum District, where it continues to serve the city’s creative arts communities with accessible and equitable arts education, workshops, and programming. Its programs support and engage readers and writers of creative fiction, poetry, and nonfiction. Learn more about www.inprinthouston.org.

press contact

Inprint Houston[email protected]

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